III
EXAMPLES OF DYNAMIC SYSTEM MODELS
Part III, consisting of the next four chapters, contains two system models to illustrate the model-building discussion of the preceding chapters.The models themselves are but examples. They are not intended to have universal applicability.The economics literature has often tended to emphasize the uniqueness, individuality, and the durability of models. One sees many references of the form "so-and-so's model of -----," as if the designer of the model were irrevocably committed to the particular form that may have appeared in a publication. In the system studies that we are discussing here, there is no such thing as "the model." A model will continuously evolve, sometimes a particular form surviving for no longer than a single computer run giving one time history of system operation. Results of studying the model lead to constant change--often extensive change. One phase of a study may center around one model form, while other classes of questions are answered by a different or more extensive model.
The first model, in Chapters 15 and 16, is the same as the one used in Chapter 2. It is a simple distribution system involving inventories and flows of orders and goods. It is extended to include a simple aspect of the market and sales effort.
The second model, in Chapters 17 and 18, is similar in complexity but deals with a double-loop system in which the customer-supplier loop interacts with the supplier-labor loop. In that model, money flow has been added.

Neither of these two models incorporates the more subtle factors that are often significant in industrial system behavior. Such factors are beyond the scope of this present volume and also would require the presentation of models that have not yet been sufficiently refined to justify their inclusion. However, to compensate for the incompleteness of the models of Part III, Chapter 19 of Part IV contains discussions of additional facets of the industrial picture that have received partial study in other dynamic system models.

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