INDEX
Academic program, for freshman, vii
in industrial dynamics, 350-354
at M.I.T., 353-354
Accounting information, 335-336
Accuracy, defined, 57
AC Spark Plug Division, 324, 458
Adequacy, see Validity
Advertising, added to production-distribution system, 36-42, 187-207
causing production instability, 36- 42, 187-207
proportional to sales, 36, 190-192
time response to, 194-195
Aggregation, into continuous flows, 65
of whole industry, 187, 211, 340-341
see also Delays, aggregation, and Variables, aggregation
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ix
Amplification, from adjusting levels, 348
affected by decay rate, 202-203
as characteristic of information- feedback system, 62-63
from delays, 348
from forecasting, 138, 349
frequency-sensitive, 202, 349, 442
from inventory policies, 138, 173, 209
from ordering procedures, 22, 173- 175
in pipelines, 138, 173
stability by reducing, 204
of system, 254, 260, 424
from variable delay, 182, 202, 212, 348
see also Delays, Noise, amplification of, Smoothing
Analog computer, 18-19, 68
Assumptions, see Models, assumptions about system
Atomic fuel, 339
Automobile, see Market
Auxiliary equations, see Equations,
auxiliary, Flow diagram, auxiliary-variable symbol
Averaging of data, see Smoothing, Equations, smoothing
Balance sheet, continuous, 263, 296
Ballmer, Ray W., 322, 457
Bandwidth, 54
described, 54, 125
in nonlinear system, 125
prediction related to, 125, 126, 430
solution interval related to, 80
as system characteristic, 54
Battin, Richard H., 412, 458
Beef, production dynamics, 104
Bennett, Richard K., ix, 369
Boundaries of models, see Models, scope
Bowles, Edward L., viii
Bowman, Edward H., ix
Boxcar train, flow-diagram symbols, 84-85 see also Delays, boxcar train
Boyd, Constance D., ix
Brooks, E. P., viii
Brown, Gordon S., viii, 14, 457
Brown, Robert G., ix, 338, 458
Bryant, Lynwood S., ix
Buoncristiani, John F., ix
Bursk, Edward C., ix
Business games, see Management games
Business Week, 98
Campbell, Donald P., 14, 457
Capital equipment, flow symbol for, 82
flow system, described, 71
introduced, 13
Carlson, Bruce R., ix
Cash flow, 240-245, 263, 296
Chapman, John F., ix
Chrysler Corporation, 313, 458
Churchman, C. West, 123, 457
Combining variables, see Variables, aggregation
Commodity dynamics, 321-324
inventories, 322
price changes, 322
Competition, 336-337
Computer, see Analog computer, Digital computers
Computing, sequence, 73-75, 396-401 time required, see Digital computers, time required
Constants, see Parameters
Controlled experiments, 43
models for, 55
Correlated data, 118
Countercyclical policy, see Policy, countercyclical
Cycles created by forecasts, 443-449
Damping, defined, 113
Data, collection of, 141
see also Information for constructing models, data, Parameters, Statistical estimation
Davenport, Wilbur B., Jr., 412, 458
Dead-zone instability, 233-234, 274
Decision functions, to control rates, 69
determining form, 103-107
factors to include, 104
inputs to, 103
noise in, 107-108
nonlinearity in, 106-107
omission of feedback paths, 107
parameters, model correction of inaccuracy, 105
as policy statement, 69
positive feedback, 104
short-term vs. long-term effects, 104
see also Decision making, Equations, rate. Flows, Information, for constructing models, Policy, Rates
Decision making, as continuous process, 96
controlling flows, 95
delays in, 151
determining basis of, 17
discussion of, 93-108
as foundation for industrial dynamics, 17
implicit, 102, 151, 164
information-feedback context, 94
levels as input, 95
in military tactics, 17
nature of process, 95-96
overt, 102, 151, 162-164
three paris, 95
action, 96
apparent state, 96, 452
desired state, 95-96, 148, 348
threshold in, 233-234, 274
viewing distance, 96
see also Decision functions, Policy
Deferrability of purchase, 36, 187-189
Delays, 86-92, 418-421
in advertising response, 194-195
aggregation, effect of, 110-111
boxcar train, examples, 447
flow-diagram symbols, 84-85
as characteristic of information- feedback-system, 15
characteristics, length determining steady-state, 87
transient response, 87, 89-92
communications, 155
at conversion points, 64
decision-making, representation, 151
equations for, 87-89, 418-419
exponential, equations for third-order, 89, 419
higher-order, 88

-459-

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