The Law of the Soviet State

By Andrey Y. Vyshinsky; Hugh W. Babb | Go to book overview

III
The Social Organization of the USSR

SEC. 1: INTRODUCTION

AS hereinbefore pointed out, Soviet public law embraces the legal rules and relationships which confirm and organize as well the social arrangement of the USSR -- that is to say, the order of socialist relationships in the economic, political and cultural fields of social life.1

The principles, forms, and character of our social organization are defined in the Stalin Constitution (in the chapter on Social Organization) in the most amplified, exact, and classical shape. The class structure of Soviet society, its political and economic bases -- that is to say, that which in its entirety also constitutes social organization -- are defined in extraordinarily sharp, and classically exact, juridical form.

In the bourgeois public law and bourgeois constitutions there is no section concerned specially with social organization. Separate matters of social organization are, to be sure, treated therein, but they are scattered about in the utmost diversity. As a general rule the most important matters of social organization -- those concerned with the class structure of society and the class essence of the state -- are obscured in bourgeois public law. Lastly, and most important, bourgeois public law poses and "resolves" questions of social organization absolutely unsuccessfully, pervertedly, and in complete contradiction with social-economic and political reality.

It is not difficult to disclose the causes and essence of the difference between Soviet public law and bourgeois law in this regard. It is rooted in the class antithesis of these two historical types of law. Soviet law reflects and confirms social orders agreeable and advantageous to the toiling classes -- the

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1
In the Stalin Constitution, "social order" and "social organization" express essentially the same content -- the socialist order existing in our land.

-129-

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