The Law of the Soviet State

By Andrey Y. Vyshinsky; Hugh W. Babb | Go to book overview

VIII
The Court and the Prosecutor's Office

SEC. 1: THE COURT AND THE PROSECUTOR'S OFFICE IN THE SOCIALIST STATE OF WORKERS AND PEASANTS

THE COURT and the prosecutor's office occupy a special place in the system of organs of state authority in the USSR. The principles underlying the organization and activity of the Soviet court and the Soviet prosecutor's office are confirmed in Chapter IX of the Stalin Constitution and in the law, Concerning the Judicial System of the USSR and of the Union and Autonomous Republics. Appropriate chapters devoted to the court and the prosecutor's office are found in the constitutions of all the Union Republics. Both these systems of organs of state authority, the court system and the prosecutor's office, are powerful and actual levers of the proletarian dictatorship by means of which it assures the fulfillment of its historical tasks, strengthens the socialist legal order, and combats those who violate the laws of Soviet authority.

The court in the USSR is an organ preserving the interests of the socialist state and Soviet citizens. Under socialism the interests of the state and those of the vast majority of citizens are not, as they are in the exploiter countries, mutually contradictory. "Socialism does not deny individual interests-it amalgamates them with those of the collective," as Stalin remarked in his conversation with H. G. Wells. "Socialism cannot be isolated from individual interests. It is only socialist society that can most completely satisfy those individual interests. Furthermore, socialist society represents the only stable guarantee that the interests of personality will be safeguarded."1 Safeguarding the interests of the socialist state, the court thereby safeguards also the interests of citizens for whom the might of the state is the primary condition essential for their individual well-being. Safeguarding

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1
Stalin, Questions of Leninism (10th Russian ed.), p. 602.

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