Yeats: the Nineteenth Century Matrix

By Dwight Eddins | Go to book overview

I
Drama Versus Picture: the Romantic and Elizabethan Background

"WE WERE THE LAST ROMANTICS. . . ." THE context of the phrase in "Coole Park and Ballylee" leaves no question of the sense in which Yeats regarded himself and chosen contemporaries as "Romantics"; it was a sense broad enough to include the classical poet Homer, and was centered upon the choice of lofty and traditionally-ennobling subject matter, as opposed to the intentional search for the quotidian which Yeats saw as a dominating concern of many modern poets. As several generations of scholars have demonstrated, however, Yeats' earliest verse was also Romantic in the more usual and specialized sense; it obviously derived much of its characteristic tenor from Yeats' immersion in Shelley and Keats, and in those exotic and supernatural portions of Elizabethan and Jacobean verse which had previously inspired the Romantic poets.

The assets and liabilities of this heritage have led, inevitably, to a deep division between critics. One extreme is found in Louis MacNeice, who believes that the early Yeats languished temporarily and unfortunately in Romanticism as in the awkwardness of adolescence; and another in Harold Bloom, who finds what is good in Yeats' poetry to be more or less what represents an organic extension of the Romantic tradition, and what is bad

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Yeats: the Nineteenth Century Matrix
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Abbreviations Used in References vi
  • Preface vii
  • I- Drama versus Picture- The Romantic and Elizabethan Background 3
  • II- Patriotism versus Art- The Irish Background 41
  • III- The Late Victorian Context 79
  • IV- The Nascence of Yeats'' Symbolism 128
  • V- Epilogue 155
  • Select Bibliography 167
  • Index 169
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.