Price Warfare in Business Competition: A Study of Abnormal Competitive Behavior

By Ralph Cassady | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
PRICE WARFARE AND ARMED CONFLICT: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS*

Intensive competitive effort of any kind may be likened to warfare. Great striving for bargaining advantage between organized labor and management has some of the characteristics of warfare, especially when negotiations break down and strikes or lockouts develop. Even. athletic rivalry possesses certain similarities to warfare.1 The main idea of the game of football, for example, is to penetrate the territory beyond the opponent's goal line notwithstanding the efforts of the defense to prevent this.2

Price wars are a form of unrestrained conflict among business firms for the attainment of some commercial objective in which price is the major competitive weapon. The author has been working for several years on an empirical study of price wars among business concerns. In connection with this, literally scores of hyper-intensive competitive situations have been placed "under glass" in numerous merchandise fields in order to discover something about competitive behavior in such circumstances.3 One by-product of this study has been an attempt to evaluate the term "price war" as an accurate designation for hyper-intensive competitive activity of the type so delineated.

It is the purpose of this brief article to present a detailed comparison of price warfare and armed conflict with the purpose of determining the similarities and dissimilarities between the two. It is hoped that some horizons may be pushed back in the process and that some new light may be thrown on the nature of business competition (and even on market strategy and tactics).


Similarities Between Price Wars and Armed Conflict

It would appear that business competition and international relations are in some ways closely parallel conditions -- that in each type of activity goals are normally attained without conflict if possible, but that from time to time hostilities breakout between those determined

____________________
*
Reproduced with permission from the Michigan Business Review, November 1956, pp. 1-5.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Price Warfare in Business Competition: A Study of Abnormal Competitive Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 97

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.