Technology and Resistance: Digital Communications and New Coalitions around the World

By Ann De Vaney; Stephen Gance et al. | Go to book overview

these global gatekeepers. Nelson Mandela believes they will persist and said as much in a farewell speech before the United Nations:

I will continue to entertain the hope that there has emerged a cadre of leaders in my own country and region, on my continent and in the world, which will not allow that any should be denied their freedom as we were; that any should be turned into refugees as we were; that any should be condemned to go hungry as we were; that any should be stripped of their human dignity as we were. ...Then would history and the billions throughout the world proclaim that it was right that we dreamed and that we toiled to give life to a workable dream. ( Mandela 1998, A3).


Notes
1.
In this chapter I use the phrase "postmodern world" instead of "New World Order," because many of the grassroots movements reported here and elsewhere stand against the economic structure of the New World Order.
2.
I maintain contact with and receive stories from Asian and African students who received their Ph.D.s under my guidance in the late seventies and eighties. Some of them have participated in democratic resistance movements and employed electronic technology along with their colleagues.
3.
Heidegger asserted that scholarship that simply investigates whether the objects of study in a field are good or evil can reduce an important line of inquiry to idle chatter ( McHoul 1998).
4.
The fusion of separate concepts, technology and progress, into a unified myth had a particular genesis in the United States. Although the myth has its origin in Western industrial revolutions and was explained in the rhetoric of Enlightenment philosophers, its articulation in America depended on the acceptance of doctrines emerging from utilitarianism, empiricism, and social efficiency in the earlier part of this century ( Berman 1994; Cahoone 1988; Ross 1991; Wiebe 1995). During the second wave of the industrial revolution in the United States, the country experienced its largest capital expansion. Pragmatic citizens saw technology at the heart of this prosperity, and their belief in machines could not even be dislodged by an

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