Technology and Resistance: Digital Communications and New Coalitions around the World

By Ann De Vaney; Stephen Gance et al. | Go to book overview

conditions from which organizers participate, their virtual space reflects the contestations of the physical space of the movement. This said, the Internet nonetheless provides a rich new space for democratic activists to join in solidarity and plan resistive activities, where many small spiders can spin a powerful web.


Notes
1.
Since its inception in September 1995, the Free Burma Coalition has generated nearly 200 articles in the international print media including the New York Times, the Guardian, the Washington Post, the Japan Times, Los Angeles Times, and Chicago Tribune.
2.
The current military government of Burma changed the name of the country to Myanmar in 1989. Although the new name is sometimes used in news accounts, Burma democracy advocates refuse to use it.
3.
Max Ediger, a Thailand-based humanitarian worker with strong ties to an Oklahoma church community, brought Moe Kyaw, the first representative from the ABSDF, on a speaking tour in the United States. Various branches of the Burmese dissident-in-exile network, CRDB, and a handful of politically minded Burmese students in the United States provided assistance for the tour.
4.
Computer science as a field of study in Burma's higher education was introduced only a few years prior to the fall of the Burma Socialist Program Party government. Even then, fewer than 100 students were admitted to the computer science program at Rangoon University, the only place in the country where computer education was provided.
5.
Edith Mirante of Portland, Oregon based Project Maje, Don Erickson of the Chicago-based SYNOPSIS, and Pam Wellner of the Berkeley-International Rivers Network are among the non-Burmese organizers. David Wolfberg of the Rainforest Action Network and Reid Cooper of Ontario Public Interest Research Group at Carleton University in Canada were the pioneers in North American Burma grassroots activism.
6.
They were Professor U Kyaw Win of the Committee for Restoration of Democracy in Burma, John Peck of UW Greens at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Larry Dohrs of Seattle Campaign for a Free Burma, Simon Billenness of the Boston-based Coalition for Corporate Withdrawal, David Wolfberg of Los Angeles Campaign for a Free Burma, Christina Fink of the Bangkok-based BurmaNet, Burmese dissident student Tun Myint of Indi

-86-

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