The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950

By Samuel L. Leiter | Go to book overview

Introduction

The Depression was over, but depression remained a worldwide ailment as the 1940s barrelled their way into history. At the decade's onset, the big question tearing at the nation's guts was whether or not it would become actively involved in the ever-hotter foreign conflagration. On December 7, 1941, the answer came when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor; America immediately declared war and dug in for the duration.

The New York theatre already had had its share of plays related to the imminent encounter, but these were relatively few in number. Most war-theme plays of the thirties took a definitely pacifist view toward the possibility of renewed hostilities. But as the situation worsened, a small number began to take a more militant stance; the most outstanding example was There Shall Be No Night, produced at the end of the 1939- 1940 season and still running when the theatrical forties proper began. War plays inspired by our actual participation were, at first, a bit slow in coming; before long, however, it would be a rare play or musical that did not have some connection--no matter how tenuous--with the conflict. The war brought years of excitement and prosperity to Broadway, but there was a sharp turnaround in the postwar period. The hedonistic "there's no tomorrow" outlook rapidly faded into a concern with the harsh realities of forging a new future for the country and the world in an era dominated by national and international fear and distrust.


THE THEATRE AT WAR

Broadway donned its most patriotic colors, not only in the types of plays and musicals it displayed, but in its active and enormously successful participation in war bond and other war-related fund-raising campaigns, including the presentation of spectacular benefit productions at the city's biggest theatres and sports arenas; in the performances in veterans' hospitals; in the provision of free or reduced-price seats to members of the armed forces (over nine million seats were thus provided); in the free matinee seats given during one fundraising drive to bond purchasers; in the junk-salvage campaigns that were important homefront activities; in the creation of outstanding hit shows-- Irving Berlin This Is the Army and Moss Hart's Winged Victory, not to mention a special revival of Candida, with Katharine Cornell--designed specifically to raise money for the war effort; in the trips to the front made by theatrical artists under USO auspices to play for the troops (a number of performers died or were injured in plane crashes); in the large number of enlistments registered among theatrical figures; and so on. Most notable of the legitimate theatre's demonstrations on behalf of the armed forces overseas was the tour to Europe's combat zones of Katharine Cornell famed production of The Barretts of Wimpole Street; Americans serving in the Pacific got to see Maurice Evans's bril-

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • Notes xlvii
  • The New York Stage, 1940-1950 1
  • A 3
  • B 51
  • C 93
  • D 143
  • E 179
  • F 193
  • G 221
  • I 293
  • J 315
  • L 341
  • M 383
  • N 443
  • O 461
  • P 491
  • Q 519
  • R 521
  • S 543
  • T 617
  • U 663
  • V 669
  • W 681
  • Y 711
  • Z 725
  • Appendixes 727
  • Appendix 1Calendar of Productions 729
  • Appendix 2 Play Categories 753
  • Appendix 5 Institutional Theatres 825
  • Appendix 7 Longest-Running Shows of the 1940s 833
  • Appendix 9 Seasonal Statistics 837
  • Appendix 10 Theatres 839
  • Selected Bibliography 843
  • Index of Titles 925
  • About the Author 947
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 954

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.