The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950

By Samuel L. Leiter | Go to book overview

Appendix 2 Play Categories

This appendix provides category listings for every full-length play covered by the entries in the text. Productions mentioned in the text, but not given full entries because of a lack of information, are also included, as are several plays that, while technically in one act, were offered as the only piece on the program. Shorter one- acts, including such important works as "The Browning Version" and "The Respectful Prostitute," are not listed here, although a list of one-acts is provided that includes the name of the programs on which they appeared. (The title of the play sometimes coincides with that of the program.) Although admittedly imperfect, these listings should prove of value to those seeking to discern patterns in playwriting and production. The lists are based on the category breakdowns printed next to the titles in the text. A small number of categories proved too common to make a listing of them here worthwhile. Most of these categories are retained in the play entries, however. Reference to them is also made in the lists that follow by the use of the following symbols: F (Family), MA (Marriage), RM (Romance, that is, plays containing one or more love interests), SX (Sex). Plays that conform only to one or more of these symbols will not be found in the listings. The categories of Comedy, Comedy-Drama, and Drama have not been repeated. Most of the remaining categories are self-explanatory, but a few words of clarification have been added where it was deemed appropriate. The lists are subsumed under several groupings: Nature of the Production; National Origin; Subject Matter; Background Locales; Foreign- Language Productions; Ethnic Groups; and Miscellaneous. Categorization applies principally to new plays (plays not produced previously in New York). Plays identified as "Dramatic Revivals" or "Musical Revivals" will have no further identifying symbols unless a specific production was given in a foreign language or a play originally intended for white actors was revived with blacks; in these cases the appropriate symbols will follow the title. In some cases a play that was new when first produced in the decade was revived again during the same period. Such a play will be found in both the revival listings and in those for new plays. Titles given are those under which the plays are listed in the entries.


Alphabetical List of Categories and Their Symbols
AD Adventure BI Bible
AL Alcoholism BL Blacks
A Art BR British
AU Australian BS Business
AV Aviation CH China
BA Barroom CI Circus
BC Broadcasting CR Crime
BH Boarding House DE Death

-753-

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The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • Notes xlvii
  • The New York Stage, 1940-1950 1
  • A 3
  • B 51
  • C 93
  • D 143
  • E 179
  • F 193
  • G 221
  • I 293
  • J 315
  • L 341
  • M 383
  • N 443
  • O 461
  • P 491
  • Q 519
  • R 521
  • S 543
  • T 617
  • U 663
  • V 669
  • W 681
  • Y 711
  • Z 725
  • Appendixes 727
  • Appendix 1Calendar of Productions 729
  • Appendix 2 Play Categories 753
  • Appendix 5 Institutional Theatres 825
  • Appendix 7 Longest-Running Shows of the 1940s 833
  • Appendix 9 Seasonal Statistics 837
  • Appendix 10 Theatres 839
  • Selected Bibliography 843
  • Index of Titles 925
  • About the Author 947
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