Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change

By David Rich Lewis | Go to book overview

4
HUPA, THE PEOPLE OF NATINOOK

In 1851, Treaty Commissioner Redick McKee learned about a people his Yurok informants called "Hoopah," a geopolitical name for the people living "where there is water" along the hupa-sr or Trinity River in northwest California. The people called themselves Natinook-wā, "the people of Natinook"--"the place by the river to which the trails lead back." Federal officials adopted variations of the Yurok appellation, designating these people the Hupa and their residence Hoopa Valley. Linguistically Hupas are members of the Athapaskan language family of the Na-Dene stock. Historically they inhabited twenty-five villages along the Trinity from its junction with the Klamath River on the north to where the South Fork of the Trinity meets Grouse Creek on the south. Their hunting and gathering territories extended from the divide between Pine and Redwood creeks on the west to the Trinity Alps and Red Cap Creek on the east. Today Hupas control a 12-mile-square reservation centered around the thirteen villages of Hoopa Valley. 1

In Hupa cosmology there are six universes, each containing a complete physical world. Then there is Deddeh Ninnisan, "This Earth," at the center of which is Hoopa Valley. This Earth has always existed except in certain details. In the first of three epochs, Yīmantūwiñyai ("the one lost across [the ocean]" or "old man over across"), the Creator and Hupa culture hero, sprang from the earth in the entryway of a xonta (a semisubterranean split cedar plank house). Following his emergence came the Kīxûnai, a race of Immortals who preceded humans on This Earth. Yīmantūwiñyai traveled throughout the world establishing its order and condition. He obtained fire, procured and gave life to deer, salmon, and eels, and provided edible herbs and roots

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Agriculture, Civilization, and American Indian Policy 7
  • Conclusion 20
  • 2 - NêC + ̆iu, the Northern Ute People 22
  • 3 - Agriculture and the Northern Utes 34
  • 4 - Hupa, the People of Natinook 71
  • 5 - Farming and the Changing Harvest Economy in Hoopa Valley 84
  • 6 - Tohono O'Odham, the Desert People 118
  • 7 - The Tohono O'Odham and Agricultural Change 133
  • Conclusion 168
  • Abbreviations 177
  • Notes 179
  • Index 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.