Ships and Memories: Merchant Seafarers in Canada's Age of Steam

By Eric W. Sager | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1
Between 1877 and 1882 Canada had 1.3 million tons of shipping on registry. Although not part of Canada, Newfoundland had 77,500 tons on registry in 1877 and 90,000 tons in 1882. Three countries had fleets larger than Canada's: the United Kingdom, the United States, and Norway. In 1879, Joseph Tasse, MP, estimated that Canada was seventh or eighth among the shipping nations of the world. He argued that a large proportion of our registered tonnage consisted of coastal vessels of a kind not included in the official totals of other nations. Canada, House of Commons Debates, 1 May 1879, 1,670-1.
2
Eric W. Sager with Gerald E. Panting, Maritime Capital: The Shipping Industry in Atlantic Canada 1820-1914 ( Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press 1990).
3
Kenneth S. MacKenzie, "'C.C. Ballantyne and the Canadian Government Merchant Marine, 1917-1921,'" Northern Mariner/Le Marin du Nord 2 ( 1992): 1-13.
4
Ibid., 7.
5
"Review of Canadian Maritime History,'" Second Report of the Canadian Maritime Commission ( Ottawa: King's Printer 1949), 16-17; William Kaplan, Everything That Floats; Pat Sullivan , Hal Banks, and the Seamen's Unions of Canada ( Toronto: University of Toronto Press 1987), 6.
6
Gerald Morgan, 'Park Steamships: An Outline History,' unpublished paper presented to the Conference on the History of Deep-Sea Shipping at the Maritime History Group, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1983.
7
A buyer could pay as little as 10 per cent down and run the ship as government property while drawing management fees, tax relief was offered, and the owner

-157-

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Ships and Memories: Merchant Seafarers in Canada's Age of Steam
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Yarns 15
  • 2 - Going to Sea 29
  • 3 - Work 41
  • 4 - Officers and Masters 71
  • 5 - Class 85
  • 6 - Family 97
  • 7 - Masculinity 106
  • 8 - Hazards 118
  • 9 - War 126
  • 10 - Union 139
  • 11 - Canada 150
  • Notes 157
  • GLOSSARY 167
  • SOURCES AND COLLABORATORS 171
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 173
  • Index 177
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