Hearst: Lord of San Simeon

By Oliver Carlson; Ernest Sutherland Bates | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV

Outdemagogued Demagogue

ALTHOUGH Hearst had not been nominated for public office since 1910, through his papers he had continued to exercise a very considerable political influence in New York City and Chicago. Andrew M. Lawrence, who was in charge of the Chicago section of Hearst's newspaper domain, is described by Winkler as "a posturing, pompous man, somewhat resembling Mussolini facially and in physique"; nevertheless, like Mussolini, he had ability of a hard-driving kind, and he established an alliance with Mayor Carter Harrison such that the Hearst-Harrison machine functioned efficiently for a number of years. But in New York, where the temperamental Hearst himself was at the helm, the political policies of his organization veered with every breeze, just as they had done from the beginning.

In 1913 he supported the Fusion candidate, John Purroy Mitchel, on a reform platform against Tammany, but then as usual he broke with his own candidate after the latter had been successfully elected. In 1914 there was a movement to secure his nomination as the Democratic candidate for United States senator, but nothing came of it. On August 25, 1914, the New York Times carried a news item headed: "HEARST SENATORIAL BOOM COLLAPSES"; the item read:

On the eve of the Democratic conference, opinion here [at Saratoga] is that William Randolph Hearst has been eliminated as a possible nominee for United States Senator in the primaries. The Hearst boom received its death blow at a meeting of a sub-committee on plat-

-202-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hearst: Lord of San Simeon
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 332

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.