Hearst: Lord of San Simeon

By Oliver Carlson; Ernest Sutherland Bates | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVIII
Business Man Embattled

THE inevitable open break with Roosevelt came at the beginning of 1935 with the President's message to the Seventy-Fourth Congress advising American entrance into the World Court. Hearst's friends, Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover had all previously suggested this course without calling down upon their heads any anathemas from the publisher, although he had always been opposed to the measure. But in his new "Americanism" campaign, the World Court, an appropriate symbol of all the personal slights and snubs he had encountered abroad, quickly became something almost demoniac. He called to his assistance Father Coughlin of Detroit, who had already done yeoman work on behalf of Hearst's inflationary policy. Coughlin had visited the publisher at San Simeon, and on trips to New York was entertained at the Hotel Warwick, the metropolitan residence of Hearst and Miss Davies. His sermons were featured at much greater length in the Hearst press than in other papers. Hearst turned over to this useful demagogue the radio attack on the Court while his editors thundered against it in writing. Congress was overwhelmed with Coughlin and Hearst telegrams -- how easily secured we have learned from the confessions of the Hearst reporter in the Kilpatrick interview -- and the recommendation of the President was decisively rejected.

As yet, however, the publisher was willing to overlook this single error of judgment on Roosevelt's part, provided his other

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