The Development of the American Short Story: An Historical Survey

By Fred Lewis Pattee | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
BRET HARTE

I

At this point--at the moment when James and Howells and Aldrich and others seemed to be succeeding in their attempt to standardize the short story and to bring it to a basis of truth, with the technique that Poe had dreamed of and that his French disciples had accomplished--suddenly occurred an incident that stampeded the new form and turned it for a generation at least into new directions. The Pacific railroad had finally been driven across the Sierras in 1868, and one of the first products it bore back to the East was a new California magazine, The Overland Monthly, designed in all seriousness to be The Atlantic Monthly of the gold coast. Its first number provoked no comment, but in the second number was a "sketch," to use its author's designation, that attracted the attention of the East-- " The Luck of Roaring Camp," by one Francis Bret Harte, editor of the magazine. Six months later came another still better, "The Outcasts of Poker Flat," and then "Tennessee's Partner," best of all--the unknown writer was gaining in power. Then had come the second startling event: the young editor contributed to his magazine a humorous poem--a mere "squib," indeed--which swept over America like the gold news of '49--"Plain Language From Truthful James," or, as it became better known, "The Heathen Chinee." It was printed in every newspaper and quoted on every tongue, in England as well as in America. Hard upon this sensation had come another: the new author was abandoning California; he was moving east- ward; in Chicago he had refused the editorship of a great mid- Western magazine that was to be endowed with true Western lavishness. Following it hard had come the news that he was in Boston fêted by the Brahmins of the Saturday Club, then that he had been made a contributing editor of The Atlantic with a salary of $10,000 for whatever he might deign to write for the magazine during a year. Never before, even in the days of Irving and the

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Development of the American Short Story: An Historical Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.