The Social History of Art - Vol. 4

By Arnold Hauser | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
VII. NATURALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
1. THE GENERATION OF 18303

The foundations of the nineteenth century; The rule of capital; The permanent revolution; Journalism and literature; The serial novel; "L'art pour l'art"; Stendhal as spokesman of post-revolutionary youth; The idea of the class struggle; Classical-romantic and modern psychology; Balzac's sociology; The pathology of capitalism; The discovery of the ideological determination of thought; The "triumph of realism"; The renewal of cyclical form; The secret of Balzac's art

2. THE SECOND EMPIRE60

Eclecticism; The naturalism of the mid-century; Courbet; Art as relaxation; The reinterpretation of "l'art pour l'art"; Flaubert's wrestling with the spirit of romanticism; Aesthetic nihilism; The struggle for the "mot just"; "Bovarysm"; Flaubert's conception of time; Zola; The "idealism" of the bourgeoisie; The new theatre public; The apotheosis Of the family in the drama; The "pi¨ce bien faite"; The operetta; "Grand opera"; Richard Wagner

3. THE SOCIAL NOVEL IN ENGLAND AND RUSSIA106

Idealists and utilitarians; The second romantic movement; The pre-Raphaelites; Ruskin; Morris; The cultural problem of technics; The antecedents of the social novel in England; The novel in monthly instalments and the new reading public; Dickens; The novel of the mid-Victorian period; The bourgeoisie and the intelligentsia; The Russian intelligentsia; Westernizers and Slavophils; The activism of the Russian novel; The psychology of self-estrangement; Dostoevsky; Tolstoy

4. IMPRESSIONISM166

The modern dynamic attitude to life; Impressionism and naturalism; The predominance of painting; The crisis of naturalism; Aesthetic hedonism; The "vie factice"; The decadent movement; The artist and the bourgeois outlook on life; The escape from civilization; The transformation of the bohème; Symbolism; "Poésie pure"; Modernism in England; Dandyism; The aesthetic movement; Intellectualism; International impressionism; Chekhov; The problem of the

-v-

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The Social History of Art - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Chapter 7 - Naturalism and Impressionism 3
  • Chapter 8 - The Film Age 226
  • Index 261
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