The Soviet Bureaucratic Elite: A Case Study of the Ukrainian Apparatus

By John A. Armstrong | Go to book overview

Footnotes to Chapter 2
1
Since Party organizations are formed in places of employment, however, Party activity is really an aspect of the official's duties.
2
Mariia Maksimovna Pidtychenko, Secretary of Propaganda for Kiev city Party committee, "Ob ideinom urovne rukovodiashchikh sovetskikh kadrov [Concerning the Level of Ideas of Directing Soviet Cadres]", Pravda Ukrainy (hereafter cited as PU), August 30, 1945. Apparently the extremely late hours, established to conform to Stalin's own peculiar working habits, have been abandoned since his death.
3
Peter Vershigora, Liudi s chistoi sovest'iu [People With Clean Consciences] ( Moscow: Sovetskii Pisatel', rev. ed., 1951), p. 49.
4
Talcott Parsons, The Social System ( Glencoe, Illinois: The Free Press, 1951), pp. 160-161 (quoted by permission).
5
Aleksei Fedorovich Fedorov, The Underground Committee Carries On ( Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1952), pp. 11-13. This is a translation of the first part of Fedorov's memoirs (published in Russian in 1947).
6
On January 1, 1955, Drogobych oblast had over 1,000 "directing workers"; L'vov oblast had 913 on January 1, 1951. See I. T. Pinegin, "Rabota KP Ukrainy po osushchestvleniiu reshenii partii o podbore, rasstanovke i vospitanii rukovodiashchikh partiinykh i sovetskikh kadrov v poslevoennyi period (1946- 1955 gg.)" [The Work of the Communist Party of the Ukraine in Carrying Out the Decision of the Party Concerning the Selection, Assignment, and Training of Directing Party and Soviet Cadres in the Postwar Period (1946-1955)], an unpublished dissertation for obtaining the academic degree of candidate of historical sciences in the Academy of Social Sciences of the Central Committee of the CPSU, Moscow, 1955, p. 174. Table 6 below is based on this source, p. 111.
7
All data for composition of Congress membership in this and other tables in this chapter are based on figures provided in the reports of the Credentials Committee of the Congresses. Sources for the Congresses are as follows: Fourteenth Congress ( June, 1938), Visti, June 17, 1938; Fifteenth Congress ( May, 1940), Kolhospnyk Ukraïny, May 17, 1940; Sixteenth Congress ( January, 1949), PU, February 5, 1949; Seventeenth Congress ( September, 1952), PU, September 26, 1952; Eighteenth Congress ( March, 1954), Radians'ka Ukraïna (hereafter cited as RU), March 26, 1954; Nineteenth Congress ( January, 1956), PU, January 20, 1956. Data in all categories are not, of course, available for all Congresses. Data presented apply to full delegates only; the relatively small number of delegates "with consultative votes" has not been included.
8
While independently calculated, the distribution of Central Committee membership is, of course, ultimately derived from Soviet sources. The process involves the identification of persons listed as elected to the Central Committee by finding them listed elsewhere as holding specific positions in the apparatus, at a time or under circumstances which make it probable that they held the same post when elected to the Central Committee. It seems most unlikely that the Soviet press could afford in any considerable number of cases to list a high- or medium-rank official as holding a position which he did not in fact hold.
9
Of those checked at random, only the Fifth ( 1949) and Sixth ( 1952) Congresses of the Kirgiz Party revealed the delegates' nationalities. Neither

-28-

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The Soviet Bureaucratic Elite: A Case Study of the Ukrainian Apparatus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • 1- Identifying the Decision-Makers 1
  • Footnotes to Chapter 1 9
  • 2- The Elite as a Social Group 11
  • Footnotes to Chapter 2 28
  • 3- Training for Rule 31
  • Footnotes to Chapter 3 43
  • 4- Bosses of the Apparatus 45
  • Footnotes to Chapter 4 58
  • Footnotes to Chapter 5 70
  • 6- Mechanisms of Control 72
  • Footnotes to Chapter 6 85
  • 7- Indoctrination Specialists 88
  • Footnotes to Chapter 7 103
  • 8- The Apparatus in Crisis: Expansion 105
  • Footnotes to Chapter 8 123
  • 9- The Apparatus in Crisis: War 126
  • Footnotes to Chapter 9 138
  • 10- A New Oligarchy? 142
  • Footnotes to Chapter 10 151
  • Bibliography 152
  • Index 163
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