The Soviet Bureaucratic Elite: A Case Study of the Ukrainian Apparatus

By John A. Armstrong | Go to book overview

7
Indoctrination Specialists

IT is scarcely an exaggeration to say that the Soviet system rests upon indoctrination. Termed "ideological work" by Soviet writers, indoctrination means, of course, the process of securing the internal consent of the population to the current policies and interpretations of events presented by the leadership, as well as its allegiance to the ideology generally referred to as "Marxism- Leninism." Despite their frequent resort to extreme coercion to secure external compliance with their commands, the Soviet leaders have realized that the system can be stable only if the mass of the people is at least half-convinced of the wisdom of these commands and of the ideology underlying them.

Because the process of indoctrination is essentially political, it has been reserved almost entirely to the Party itself.1 Since securing the loyalty of the population is central to the aims of the regime, the major leaders of the Party at each level of its structure devote a great deal of attention to this activity. In the Ukraine the first secretaries usually devote a considerable proportion of their reports to Congresses and other general speeches to indoctrinational matters, and the reports of the obkom first secretaries follow a similar pattern. Frequently, too, the second secretaries at both the Central Committee and the obkom level have devoted a great deal of attention to indoctrination.

In addition to being of central interest to these line officials at each level of the Party, however, the indoctrinational field is the special province of a highly ramified branch of the Party organization. The central agency of this network is the Propaganda and Agitation Section of the Central Committee Secretariat, with corresponding sections at the lower levels of the Party pyramid.2 While there have been several changes in the scope and organiza-

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Soviet Bureaucratic Elite: A Case Study of the Ukrainian Apparatus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • 1- Identifying the Decision-Makers 1
  • Footnotes to Chapter 1 9
  • 2- The Elite as a Social Group 11
  • Footnotes to Chapter 2 28
  • 3- Training for Rule 31
  • Footnotes to Chapter 3 43
  • 4- Bosses of the Apparatus 45
  • Footnotes to Chapter 4 58
  • Footnotes to Chapter 5 70
  • 6- Mechanisms of Control 72
  • Footnotes to Chapter 6 85
  • 7- Indoctrination Specialists 88
  • Footnotes to Chapter 7 103
  • 8- The Apparatus in Crisis: Expansion 105
  • Footnotes to Chapter 8 123
  • 9- The Apparatus in Crisis: War 126
  • Footnotes to Chapter 9 138
  • 10- A New Oligarchy? 142
  • Footnotes to Chapter 10 151
  • Bibliography 152
  • Index 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.