The Soviet Bureaucratic Elite: A Case Study of the Ukrainian Apparatus

By John A. Armstrong | Go to book overview

Footnotes to Chapter 8
1.
On the former Polish areas, see A. Mareev, battalion commissar, "Vremenye upravleniia i krest'ianskie komitety--organy revoliutsionoi narodnoi vlasti" [The Provisional Administrations and the Peasant Committees--Organs of the Revolutionary Popular Power], Partiino-Politicheskaia Rabota v RKKA, No. 21 (November), 1939, pp. 45-46. For confirmation by a non-Army source, see Visti, September 20, 1939. For the Rumanian areas, the scanty information available indicates that the same situation prevailed; see Krasnaia Zvezda, July 12, 1940.
2.
Visti, September 29, 1939.
3.
See Kolhospnyk Ukraïny, September 26, 1939, and Visti, September 29, 1939.
4.
Visti, September 20, 1939.
5.
A group of communications workers from Zhitomir was sent to the border town of Korets; from there they got in touch by telephone with M. A. Siromiatnikov, the first secretary of the Zhitomir obkom; see Visti, September 20, 1939. This same unit was apparently later in Rovno; see Visti, September 21, 1939.
6.
Visti, September 20, 1939, and September 24, 1939.
7.
The "war situation" ended in Ternopol' voevod, the easternmost section of the areas acquired from Poland, at 5:00 p.m. on September 25, 1939 ( Krasnaia Zvezda, September 30, 1939).
8.
Visti, October 9, 1939.
9.
Visti, December 9, 1939.
10.
Grigori Ivanovich Lomov "Ustanovlenie i ukreplenie sovetskoi vlasti v zapadnoi Ukraine ( 1939- 1941 gg.)" [Establishment and Strengthening of Soviet Power in the West Ukraine ( 1939- 1941)], an unpublished dissertation for obtaining the academic degree of candidate of historical sciences in the Institute of History of the Ukraine, Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian S.S.R., 1953 (L'vov), p. 230.
11.
See Stalinskoe Plemia, August 21, 1940, for the confirmation of the obkom bureaus.
12.
For a detailed discussion of Czechoslovak-Soviet relations concerning Transcarpathia and particularly the events in the area during 1944, see Frantisek Nemec and Vladimir Moudry, The Soviet Seizure of Subcarpathian Ruthenia ( Toronto: William B. Anderson, 1955). Nemec was the principal Czechoslovak representative in the area. Vasyl Markus, in L'Incorporation de l'Ukraine Subcarpathique à l'Ukraine Soviétique, 1944- 1945 (Louvain: Centre Ukrainien d'Etudes en Belgique, 1956), presents a Ukrainian nationalist account. For an analysis of events in Transcarpathia, I am also much indebted to Capt. Berry, U.S.A., who prepared a paper on this subject for my seminar at the Russian Institute, Columbia University, 1957.
13.
See Nemec and Moudry, p. 161, on the ascendancy of Mekhlis over the Red Army military commander.
14.
Ibid., p. 85, and the contemporary document reproduced on pp. 271-277. On the other hand, Turianitsia's obituary in the Soviet press states that he went to Transcarpathia as a commissar of the Third Special Brigade of the Czechoslovak Corps which was formed during the war in the U.S.S.R. ( RU, March 29, 1955).
15.
Ibid.

-123-

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The Soviet Bureaucratic Elite: A Case Study of the Ukrainian Apparatus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • 1- Identifying the Decision-Makers 1
  • Footnotes to Chapter 1 9
  • 2- The Elite as a Social Group 11
  • Footnotes to Chapter 2 28
  • 3- Training for Rule 31
  • Footnotes to Chapter 3 43
  • 4- Bosses of the Apparatus 45
  • Footnotes to Chapter 4 58
  • Footnotes to Chapter 5 70
  • 6- Mechanisms of Control 72
  • Footnotes to Chapter 6 85
  • 7- Indoctrination Specialists 88
  • Footnotes to Chapter 7 103
  • 8- The Apparatus in Crisis: Expansion 105
  • Footnotes to Chapter 8 123
  • 9- The Apparatus in Crisis: War 126
  • Footnotes to Chapter 9 138
  • 10- A New Oligarchy? 142
  • Footnotes to Chapter 10 151
  • Bibliography 152
  • Index 163
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