The Earliest Times

By Frantz Funck-Brentano; E. F. Buckley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
CELTIC GAUL

The invasion of Gaul by the Celts towards the end of the 6th century B.C. The formation of the Gallic nation. The Druids. Physical Geography of Celtic Gaul. The divisions of society: the family, the clan, the tribe, the people. Primitive monarchy. The vergobrets. The movements of the Celts in the 4th century: their conquests. Ambigatus, king of the Bituriges. Character of the Gauls. Foundation of Marseilles. The States of Gaul in the 4th century B.C. The features of the principal ones. The civilisation of the Gauls: their houses, their industry, their clothes. Organisation of feudal Gaul. Picture of Gaul during the last century of her independence ( second century B.C.). First invasions of the Romans. End of monarchy in Gaul. Conquest by the Romans of Transalpine Gaul (Provence). The three provinces of Gaul: Gallia togata, Gallia braccata, Gallia comata. Peculation of the Roman governors. Population of
Gaul before the arrival of Cæsar.

THE Celts came from the north, from those nurseries of the nations--Jutland, Friesland and the coasts of the Baltic. They were the Normans of the sixth century before our era. They gave to themselves the name of Celts. They were also called Galates. The Romans called them "Galli." This word was used for the first time in Cato Origines (the second quarter of the second century B.C.). From Gallus, Galli, was derived the name of Gaul and the Gauls.

The Invasion.

To the ancients the three appellations, Celtes, Galates, and Galli, were synonymous; but Auguste Longnon is of opinion that originally they were applied to three different branches of the same race. A fourth branch must have been represented by the Volcæ, who, in the first century before our era, had settled down between the Danube and the Main. The name given to the Celtic tribes of the Gauls, after passing through an

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The Earliest Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Title Page vii
  • Chapter I The Prehistoric Period 1
  • Chapter II Celtic Gaul 27
  • Chapter III Roman Gaul 84
  • Chapter IV The Merovingians 210
  • Chapter V The Carlovingians 299
  • Index 433
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