CHAPTER V
WORSHIP AND MAGIC (continued): THE CALENDAR

NOTHING is more noticeable in the festivals of the Roman republic, on which we are obliged to depend very largely for our knowledge of early Italian worship, than their markedly seasonal character. So far at least as official public cult is concerned, there is hardly a deity who is worshipped all the year round; they take their turns as their functions are required. Thus, Volkanus has his festival in late summer, August 23, when fires are likeliest to occur in the hot dry weather; Consus and Ops, the deities of the store-bin, are worshipped about the same time (after the last of the harvest is in) and again in the middle of December (winter wheat is sown at various dates from October to January, according to latitude and height above sea-level), with the festival of the god of sowing, the Saturnalia, in between them. Mars is honoured at various times in his own month, March, at the beginning of the campaigning season, and again when that season is over, in October. Even Iuppiter, though honoured in every month, for the sky is always overhead in all weathers, is not worshipped every day, but on the Ides, the day of full moon, when there is most light. Even a superficial examination of the calendar shows that it is essentially a list of festivals, and only secondarily a list of days making

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Primitive Culture in Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - Introductory 1
  • Notes on Chapter I 20
  • Chapter II - Race, Religion and Culture 22
  • Notes on Chapter II 41
  • Chapter III - The Gods 42
  • Notes on Chapter IIi 61
  • Chapter IV - Worship and Magic 63
  • Notes on Chapter IV 85
  • Chapter V - Worship and Magic (continued): The Calendar 87
  • Notes on Chapter V 110
  • Chapter VI - Tabus, Priests, and Kings 111
  • Notes on Chapter VI 130
  • Chapter VII - Their Exits and Their Entrances 131
  • Notes on Chapter VIi 158
  • Chapter VIII - Family and Clan 159
  • Notes on Chapter VIii 179
  • Chapter IX - The Law. I. Crimes and Torts 180
  • Notes on Chapter IX 201
  • Chapter X - The Law. II. Property; Public Opinion; Status, Etc. 203
  • Notes on Chapter X 224
  • Chapter XI - Some Negative Considerations. Conclusion 226
  • Notes on Chapter XI 242
  • Bibliography 244
  • Index 247
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