CHAPTER VII
THEIR EXITS AND THEIR ENTRANCES

SINCE Dr. van Gennep wrote his brilliant book, Les Rites de Passage, we have been accustomed to recognize the importance, to the savage, of the passages from one state of existence (such as childhood) to another (such as maturity). To civilized men it seems self-evident that John Brown, aged twenty-five, is the same person as John Brown of a dozen years ago, aged thirteen, except that he has grown taller and broader and gained knowledge and experience; but to primitive man, it would appear, the proposition was not so axiomatic. Indeed, it might seem to him very strange that we went on calling him by the same name, and stranger still that we had let him simply grow into his new state, without so much as removing a tooth or imposing a tabu, to get him safely across the wide gulf between child and man. It is still felt to be necessary, and that not wholly or even primarily for reasons of public policy, to have more or less ceremony if the man, hitherto single, wants to become married; and later on, many consider it at least desirable that an expert, known as a priest or clergyman, should attend him when he is dying; but in the meantime he is left to pass from stage to stage unaided, except in so far as he may, of his own accord, seek advice or help at this or that crisis.

Anthropology, social anthropology at least, has a long way to go yet before it can apply mathematical prin-

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Primitive Culture in Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - Introductory 1
  • Notes on Chapter I 20
  • Chapter II - Race, Religion and Culture 22
  • Notes on Chapter II 41
  • Chapter III - The Gods 42
  • Notes on Chapter IIi 61
  • Chapter IV - Worship and Magic 63
  • Notes on Chapter IV 85
  • Chapter V - Worship and Magic (continued): The Calendar 87
  • Notes on Chapter V 110
  • Chapter VI - Tabus, Priests, and Kings 111
  • Notes on Chapter VI 130
  • Chapter VII - Their Exits and Their Entrances 131
  • Notes on Chapter VIi 158
  • Chapter VIII - Family and Clan 159
  • Notes on Chapter VIii 179
  • Chapter IX - The Law. I. Crimes and Torts 180
  • Notes on Chapter IX 201
  • Chapter X - The Law. II. Property; Public Opinion; Status, Etc. 203
  • Notes on Chapter X 224
  • Chapter XI - Some Negative Considerations. Conclusion 226
  • Notes on Chapter XI 242
  • Bibliography 244
  • Index 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.