THE PARTY AND THE PRESENT

THE passions of war are destructive of the values of Liberalism. The 1914-18 conflict represented a total overthrow of the old Liberal hopes of a world in which swords would be beaten into plough- shares, and the free exchange of goods and ideas lead to a co-operative commonwealth of the nations. In addition, the Party was badly split over personalities. The circumstances under which Mr. Lloyd George replaced Mr. Asquith as the War Prime Minister in 1916 created a long-enduring schism. Nothing is more distasteful than to revive the memory of bygone feuds, and to a generation that had no part in them they must appear extremely uninteresting. Suffice it to say, that the divisions in the Party led to a disastrous result at the General Election of 1918, the "Khaki Election," at the end of the war. The coalition of Mr. Lloyd George's Liberal and Conservative supporters swept the country, and the Asquith Liberals were reduced to 34 members, their leader, together with many former Ministers, being defeated.

Looking back now on the two decades of decay between the wars, he would be a tough and indurated partisan indeed who still rejoiced at that shattering of the Liberal Party. In 1922 the Coalition collapsed, and in the ensuing elections 64 Independent Liberals and 53 National (Lloyd Georgian) Liberals were returned. A year later Mr. Baldwin, who had succeeded Mr. Bonar Law as Prime Minister, sought a mandate for Protection as his way out of the nation's mounting economic troubles. That challenge to Free Trade sentiment united the followers of Mr. Asquith and Mr. Lloyd George, and in the 1923 elections 158 Liberals were returned, the Party polling 4,300,000 votes to Labour's 4,500,000 and Conservatism's 5,500,000. Labour had 192 members and the Conservatives 258. On the country's verdict, the Liberals had no choice but to declare against Mr. Baldwin's Government on the motion of "no confidence," and this inevitably meant that Mr. Ramsay MacDonald, as leader of the Labour Party, was called upon to form a Government. In that brief Parliament, the Liberals were treated by Mr. MacDonald, sometimes with contempt, often with irritation, as "patient oxen," and, within eleven months, a muddled and obscure incident over the prosecution of a Communist newspaper led to another dissolution. In the ensuing election, the voters were stampeded by the melodramatic "Red Letter" scare, a supposed intervention by Mr. Zinoviev of the Comintern in British politics. The Liberals were the chief casualties in this confused struggle, losing 116 seats.

During the General Strike of 1926, the breach between Mr. Asquith and Mr. Lloyd George was unhappily opened again. In 1928, Asquith, who had become Lord Oxford, died. With him there passed the distinction and amplitude of the Victorian tradition in politics. During the General Election of 1929, Mr. Lloyd George conducted a vigorous campaign on a

-42-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Liberal Party
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • List of Illustrations 5
  • Introduction 7
  • The Beginnings 11
  • The Golden Age 24
  • Modern Liberalism 31
  • The Party and the Present 42
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 52

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.