CHAPTER ELEVEN
CREATIVE ADVANCE

WHITEHEAD'S IDEAS WILL BE EXAMINED UNDER THREE HEADings.1 We shall first look at his theory of creative advance. Here he gives a meticulous analysis of what in this essay has been called continuity. He explains how things enter into one another and how they are preserved through change. He therefore enables us to see how human purposes may endure in spite of flux. Indeed, since this flux is creative and purposive, we also are shown how by means of flux our own purposes realize a wider purpose.

Secondly, we shall consider his theory of the soul. According to this account, a man's soul, as his system of knowledge and purpose, is not an exceptional kind of thing, totally unlike things that happen in the rest of nature. The soul is another variety of the basic type of entity which constitutes the universe. Therefore, other things enter into it and it enters into other things. Knowledge is not a mere reflection of real things. Purpose is not a mere name for what might be. A man's soul is not a ghost, but a real thing, and so, in short, worth having and saving.

Also when we examine Whitehead's theory of the soul we shall see another important characteristic of some parts of the world. We shall see how a single event can happen in the body, and also in the mind or soul. Thus, we shall see how it might be possible for events to occur in human history and also to occur in a further order of things which saves and uses them. Such a saving order Whitehead describes as the Consequent Nature of God.

Our third topic will be Whitehead's theory of God. We shall see how he conceives of God, on the one hand, as a single, complex purpose which reaches to all things, and, on the

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