CHAPTER FOURTEEN
POLITICS

THE PHILOSOPHY OF CREATIVE ADVANCE SOLVES THE PROBLEM of purpose. It arms a man against irrationalism and defeatism. In the same moment it defines his duty and orders him into action. The philosophy of creative advance entails the ethics of humanity. To accept the consolations of that philosophy is also to assume the heavy burdens of this ethics.

The argument has been abstract and often, no doubt, wrong- headed. Yet I doubt that the reader will find it irrelevant to the immediate problems of government and society today. A virtue of our age is that it drives the mind to follow through the urgent problems of the moment toward deeper truths, in which a more secure and confident age might not take an interest. How far the insights of the philosophy of creative advance approach any deeper truth the reader will judge. It is also for him to determine how to use these insights when deliberating the problems of the day.

The main outlines of the political theory implied by this philososphy should already be fairly clear. Obviously, that political theory is utterly at variance with the principles of fascism, nazism, and other political forms of irrationalism. It is also hostile to Marxian communism. On the other hand, the socialist or liberal or conservative should find neither the politics nor the ethics nor the metaphysics of this book incompatible with his own political and social program. The general principles which have emerged from our argument can be shared by men of very divergent political beliefs.

Such a book as this cannot, and should not, end with a party manifesto. Yet it should be of use to men trying to formulate their own political theory and take a stand on issues which demand partisanship. How the central ideas of this book might

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