PREFACE

IT was my original intention that this work should be simply a continuation of my book The Founding of the Roman Empire, but the nature of the subject and the problems raised by the sources combined to give it a distinctive character. In view of this fact it seemed desirable to supply such a background in the first chapters as would make this study an independent work, complete in itself. Nevertheless the two books remain closely linked together, in my mind at least. In the first I have endeavoured to show how and why the republican principate came to be established by Augustus, while in this I have sought to trace the causes which were responsible for its collapse under Tiberius. My success in either undertaking is of course a matter for the reader to judge.

A word of explanation may be called for in regard to the footnotes. In general I have not considered it worth while to give references to Tacitus when the passage in question could be readily found by the reader. In citing modern works I have given only the author's name where but one of his works has been referred to in the course of this study, but I have provided the necessary bibliographical information in the 'List of Works Referred to in the Notes' at the end of the volume. This course seemed to me to have the double advantage of avoiding encumbering the notes with titles and of making it easier for the reader to verify any statement. All references to Tacitus and Suetonius are to the Annals and to the life of Tiberius respectively unless otherwise specified.

In my quotations from Tacitus I have in most cases borrowed from Ramsay's admirable translation. I do not always agree with him, but I recognize clearly that I cannot hope to improve upon his version, which has in a remarkable degree preserved the peculiar quality of the original. Nevertheless, in a few instances I have, for special reasons, given a rendering of my own, which the reader will all too easily detect apart from the lack of any acknowledgement to Ramsay.

It only remains to acknowledge my obligations to numerous

-v-

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The Reign of Tiberius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I - Tiberius and His Historians 1
  • II - The Legacy of Augustus 16
  • III - The Accession of Tiberius 45
  • IV - Germanicus 69
  • V - The Early Government of Tiberius in Rome 105
  • VI - Tiberius and the Empire 134
  • VII - The Struggle for the Succession 160
  • VIII - The Close of the Reign 200
  • Appendixes 231
  • List of Works Referred to in the Notes 311
  • Index 318
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