The Russian Soviet Republic

By Edward Alsworth Ross | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
PEACE EFFORTS
WELL aware that the prolongation of war efforts by exhausted Russia was ruining their plans for an early economic revival, the Soviet Government sought many times to learn from the Allied Governments on what terms they would cease their attacks. Let us review them seriatim.
1. AUGUST 5, 1918. Hard upon the Allied seizure of Archangel, Tchicherin addressed a communication to Acting Consul-General Poole inquiring as to the objects of the Government of Great Britain in its invasion and asking him to ascertain on what terms it would discontinue its offensive.
2. OCTOBER 17, 1918. Through the Norwegian minister to Russia Tchicherin attempted to enter into negotiations with the representatives of the Allies with a view to peace.
3. OCTOBER 24, 1918. An attaché of the Norwegian legation leaving Moscow was given a note for President Wilson proposing an immediate armistice with the Allies on condition of the evacuation of Russian territory by Allied troops.
4. NOVEMBER 3, 1918. Through the representatives of neutral countries still in Russia, Tchicherin made an official offer to the Governments of the powers to open negotiations with a view to arriving at an understanding.
5. NOVEMBER 7, 1918. The Sixth All-Russian Congress of Soviets formally declared it to be the desire of the Russian people to enter into peace negotiations with the Entente nations and authorized the commissary of foreign affairs to undertake new steps in that direction.
6. DECEMBER 3, 1918. Tchicherin despatched a radio mes-

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