CHAPTER XV
THE FARMER-STATESMAN

Wide was his parish, and houses fer asonder.
--CHAUCER

THE appointment of Bryan as Secretary of State had been distasteful not only to the better tailored members of the Cabinet, but to a large section of the eastern part of the country. His ideas did not suit the views of the seaboard, or, at any rate, the more influential elements on the Atlantic coast. He was essentially a farmer-statesman, and opposition to him came not only from those who felt he would be incompetent in office, but also from those who feared he would be much too competent in specific directions.

The difficulty in dealing with him lay in the fact that he was not ashamed of being a commoner. He did not blush to be called a farmer or the representative of farmers, and his strength lay in the fact that this was not a pose but a conviction. He was not dazzled by office nor by the favors of the so-called great. All that was far back in his history. He was not inexperienced in the ways of the world and their governments. He had twice been received by the officialdom of Europe, he had been to Mexico

-286-

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Bryan, the Great Commoner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Chapter I- Panorama 1
  • Chapter II- Evolution of the Alpaca Coat 20
  • Chapter III- The Playboy of the Western World 44
  • Chapter IV- The Coup D''état 64
  • Chapter V- Boola Boola 90
  • Chapter VI- St. George 103
  • Chapter VII- Mark Hanna Waves the Flag 115
  • Chapter VIII- Neighbor Bryan 143
  • Chapter IX- An Innocent Abroad 161
  • Chapter X- End of a Candidate 181
  • Chapter XI- The Battle of Grand Island 205
  • Chapter XII- The Cocked Hat 224
  • Chapter XIII- Baltimore 242
  • Chapter XIV- Deserving Democrats 269
  • Chapter XV- The Farmer-Statesman 286
  • Chapter XVI 305
  • Chapter XVII- Grinding Corn for the Philistines 349
  • Chapter XVIII- The Commoner and Al Smith 357
  • Chapter XIX- The Holy War 372
  • Chapter XX- Is Bryanism Dead? 397
  • Bibliography 405
  • Sources 409
  • Index 413
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