The Tillman Movement in South Carolina

By Francis Butler Simkins | Go to book overview

ship. Yet no attempt has been made to produce a biography of Tillman, for biographical matter is subordinated to the general narrative of the so-called Tillman Movement. With this purpose as a guide, the work begins with a description of politics in South Carolina after Reconstruction and with an attempt to show why the overthrow of the régime established in 1877 was inevitable; then follows a description of the early life and influences of Tillman, his advent into the politics of the state, his ideas of reform; later comes the story of his attempts at reform through others, followed by his own successful candidacy for governor, his administrative methods, and the constructive reforms which he accomplished. The study closes with an attempt to estimate the influence of Tillman upon South Carolina after he became United States senator and after his death.

In the preparation of this work the author has received the kind assistance of Mr. B. R. Tillman, the eldest son of the principal character in this study, who has given him free access to the papers in the Tillman Library at Trenton. Among the many who have given first-hand information concerning events of which they were eye witnesses, or have pointed out sources of information, the following should be mentioned: Professor Yates Snowden and Mr. R. M. Kennedy, of the University of South Carolina; the Honorable Eugene B. Gary, Chief Justice of South Carolina, Colonel

-viii-

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The Tillman Movement in South Carolina
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Portraits xii
  • Chapter I - The Background 3
  • Chapter II - Early Life of Tillman 23
  • Chapter III - The Emergence of Tillman 51
  • Chapter IV - The Farmers in Politics 70
  • Chapter V - The Election of 1890 103
  • Chapter VI - Tillman's First Administration 135
  • Chapter VII - Tillman's Re-Election and Second Administration 158
  • Chapter VIII - The Dispensary 185
  • Chapter IX - The Constitutional Convention 203
  • Chapter X - The After Effects of Tillmanism 229
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 263
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