Contempt of Court in Labor Injunction Cases

By Cleon Oliphant Swayzee | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE tendency toward highly specialized studies in the field of economics in the last few years has been met with some criticism. For the most part, this criticism has been based upon the belief that (1) detailed analysis of material of limited scope is of interest to a small number of specialists only, and that (2) such highly specialized studies have no direct and practical bearing upon the general body of economic theory. To these objections the writer would dissent vigorously, and while the argument will be stated in terms of the relationship of labor-contempt analysis to general economic theory and problems, it is believed that it will furnish a significant key to the generalized objections.

Experience in most of our industries where labor is highly organized seems definitely to point to the desirability of greatly extending worker-organized labor unions. This experience reflects two important advantages which flow from unionization. In the first place, through collective bargaining, labor organizations furnish our most satisfactory means of preventing industrial disputes, the costs of which if considered only in terms of increased expense of production and lost wages are tremendous. It is only where there is ably led and recognized organization on both sides of a dispute that effective machinery for prevention and peaceful settlement of controversies can be set up. In those disputes where the workers are poorly organized, or where their leadership is bad through inexperience, or again, where employers refuse to recognize and deal with legiti-

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