Anne Frank and After: Dutch Holocaust Literature in Historical Perspective

By Dick Van Galen Last; Rolf Wolfswinkel | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The idea for this book first came up in 1993, during a sabbatical spent in Ann Arbor, MI, lecturing on the subject of Dutch Holocaust literature at the University of Michigan. The lecturer in Dutch Studies in the Department of Germanic Studies, Ton Broos, had issued an invitation to come over from Cape Town, South Africa, to present a series of lectures. The response to that course was such that a decision was taken to do further research and write a book on the same subject.

In writing this book we have had the help of a number of people. It is only right that their names are recorded here as a small expression of our gratitude: Jacob Boas, Martijn van Hennik, Karel Margry, Henry Mason, Guus Meershoek, Bob Moore, Jos Scheren, Coen Stuldreher, Odette Vlessing, all of whom read the manuscript, or parts of it, in its pre-publication phase and commented or added their valuable knowledge. Lesly Marx in Cape Town took the trouble to check the complete text for grammatical errors and idiomatic faux-pas.

Many thanks are also due to Royden Yates ( University of Cape Town) and Gerard Aalders ( Dutch State Institute for War Documentation) for facilitating all the e-mail messages between Amsterdam and Cape Town.

It goes without saying that the responsibility for the choice of quotations rests completely with the authors.

Amsterdam/ Cape Town

Dick van Galen Last Rolf Wolfswinkel

-7-

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Anne Frank and After: Dutch Holocaust Literature in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Introduction 'Statistics Don't Bleed' 9
  • I Dutch Jewry Before 10 May 1940 15
  • II From Aryan Declaration to Yellow Star - The Antechamber of Death 33
  • III Deportation or into Hiding 53
  • IV The Transit Camps 75
  • V The Railroad of No Return 91
  • VI The Paradox of Silence: Survivors and Losers 121
  • VII The Epilogue 147
  • Notes 155
  • Chronology 165
  • Short Biographies 167
  • Bibliography 173
  • Sources 179
  • Index 181
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