Anne Frank and After: Dutch Holocaust Literature in Historical Perspective

By Dick Van Galen Last; Rolf Wolfswinkel | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Robert H. Abzug, Inside the vicious heart. American and the liberation of Nazi concentration camps ( New York 1985)

Jean Améry, At the mind's limits. Contemplations by a survivor on Auschwitz and its realities ( New York 1990)

Greet van Amstel, Verboden te leven ( Amsterdam 1965)

Milo Anstadt, Jonge jaren. Polen-Amsterdam 1920-1940 ( Amsterdam 1995)

M. S. Arnoni, Moeder was niet thuis voor haar begrafenis ( Amsterdam 1984)

Clara Asscher-Pinkhof, Star children ( Detroit 1987)

Judith Tylor Baumel, Unfulfilled promise. Rescue and resettlement of Jewish refugee children in the United States 1934-1945 ( Juneau 1990)

Michael Berenbaum, The world must know: the history of the Holocaust as told in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ( Boston etc. 1993)

Hetty Berg et al. (eds.), Geschiedenis van de joden in Nederland ( Amsterdam 1995)

Bericht van de Tweede Wereldoorlog ( Amsterdam 1971)

George E. Berkley, Hitler's gift. The story of Theresienstadt ( Boston 1993)

Michael Andre Bernstein, Foregone conclusions. Against apocalyptic history ( Berkeley etc. 1994)

Bruno Bettelheim, The informed heart. The human condition in modern mass society ( London 1961)

Maurice Blanchot, L'écriture du désastre ( Paris 1986)

Mirjam Blits, Auschwitz 13917. Hoe ik de Duitse concentratiekampen overleefde ( Amsterdam 1961)

Jacob Boas, Boulevard des Misères. The story of transit camp Westerbork (Hamden, Conn. 1985)

Jacob Boas, We are witnesses. Five diaries of teenagers who died in the Holocaust (New York 1995)

Corrie ten Boom, The hiding place ( New York 1974)

Tadeusz Borowski, This way for the gas, ladies and gentlemen ( London 1976)

Randolph Braham (ed.), Reflections of the Holocaust in art and literature ( New York 1990)

Chaya Brasz, Removing the yellow badge. The struggle for a Jewish community in the postwar Netherlands 1944-1955 ( Jerusalem 1995)

Philo Bregstein, Gesprekken met Jacques Presser ( Amsterdam 1972)

Philo Bregstein, Dingen die niet voorbijgaan. Persoonlijk geschiedverhaal van J. Presser ( Amsterdam 1981)

Alexander Bronowski, They were few ( New York etc. 1991)

Andreas Burnier, Het jongensuur gevolgd door Oorlog en Na de bevrijding ( Amsterdam 1995)

-173-

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Anne Frank and After: Dutch Holocaust Literature in Historical Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Introduction 'Statistics Don't Bleed' 9
  • I Dutch Jewry Before 10 May 1940 15
  • II From Aryan Declaration to Yellow Star - The Antechamber of Death 33
  • III Deportation or into Hiding 53
  • IV The Transit Camps 75
  • V The Railroad of No Return 91
  • VI The Paradox of Silence: Survivors and Losers 121
  • VII The Epilogue 147
  • Notes 155
  • Chronology 165
  • Short Biographies 167
  • Bibliography 173
  • Sources 179
  • Index 181
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