A Study of Chinese Boycotts, with Special Reference to Their Economic Effectiveness

By C. F. Remer; William B. Palmer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
A TROUBLED YEAR, 1927

THE COURSE OF EVENTS

The year 1927 witnessed a continuation of many of the trends which we have noted in connection with the 1925-26 boycotts. Much of the anti-British feeling, which had existed in these earlier years, continued well into 1927. The northward movement of the Nationalists, communist uprisings in the Yangtze Valley, and many labor disputes served to introduce complications. However, we shall attempt to present the essential factors in the boycotting of this year, and then turn to the question of its economic effectiveness.

During the month of January there were several occurrences which served to renew the anti-British feeling of the previous year. On January 3 a serious riot broke out in Hankow between British marines and the members of a recently formed anti-British society.1 Disturbances became so serious during the next few days that all of the British were forced to evacuate. It is of interest to note that in none of the clashes which occurred in Hankow at this time did the British marines fire upon the Chinese, although it was reported that several Chinese were fatally wounded in attempts to storm the British Concession. During the first two weeks of January, the British were forced to evacuate Kiukiang, Ichang, and Changsha because of anti-foreign demonstrations which threatened to expel all foreigners from the Yangtze Valley for a time.

As a result of the discussions over the rendition of the British Concession in Hankow to the Chinese and, also, because of the anti-imperialist bent of the Nationalist movement, January brought a revival of boycotting in Canton and Foochow, as well as in the Yangtze Valley, in spite of the efforts of Eugene Chen to check anti-British agitation while the question of the rendition of the Hankow Concession was

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