Chapter three
The Baroque of the William & Mary Style, 1700-1715

IN ENGLAND, FOLLOWING THE RESTORATION OF THE MONARCHY, there arose a tremendous demand for plate to replenish the collections of the great city companies, the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge, and the buffets of the gentry and rich merchants, most of which had been melted down during the Civil War. The introduction of luxuries by the court, as well as the general reaction against the restraints of the Commonwealth and puritanical aversion to beauty, prompted the use of bold design which by the time of the death of Charles II was chiefly expressed in gadrooned and fluted borders and surbases on vessels. So general was this demand and so profuse the work, that statutes had to be enacted to prevent a shortage of coin as a result of the wholesale melting.

While this fashion was at its height in England, New England was suffering from a long series of Indian attacks that inflicted great loss of life, property and trade. Daniel Neal writes that in 1699"after a long and expensive War, the Affairs of the Country were settled on a solid Basis, Trade began to flourish and the People rejoyced in the Blessings of Peace." Imported clothes of the latest London fashion, and the arrival of a Royal Governor with the latest London plate, helped to stimulate the first generation of American-born New Englanders to offset their provincialism by acquiring things in the latest mode. This feeling is

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