On Power, Its Nature and the History of Its Growth

By Bertrand de Jouvenel; D. W. Brogan et al. | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
TRANSLATOR'S NOTExiii
PREFACExv
THE MINOTAUR PRESENTED1

1. The proximate cause. 2. The growth of war. 3. Kings in search of armies. 4. Power extended, war extended. 5. The men whom war takes. 6. Absolute Power is not dead. 7. The the Minotaur.

BOOK I METAPHYSICS OF POWER
I. OF CIVIL OBEDIENCE17

1. The mystery of civil obedience. 2. The historical character of obedience. 3. Statics and dynamics of obedience. 4. Obedience linked to credit.

II. THEORIES OF SOVEREIGNTY26

1. Divine sovereignty. 2. Popular sovereignty. 3. Democratic popular sovereignty. 4. A dynamic of Power. 5. How sovereignty can control Power. 6. The theories of sovereignty considered in their effects.

III. THE ORGANIC THEORIES OF POWER43

1. The Nominalist conception of society. 2. The Realist conception of society. 3. Logical consequences of the Realist conception. 4. The division of labour and organicism. 5. Society, a living organism. 6. The problem of Power's extent in the organicist theory. 7. Water for Power's mill.

BOOK II ORIGINS OF lOWER
IV. THE MAGICAL ORIGINS OF POWER63

1. The classical conception: political authority the child of paternal authority. 2. The Iroguois period: the negation of the patriarchate. 3. The Australian period: the magical authority 4. Frazer's theory: the sacrificial king. 5. The invisible government. 6. The rule of the magician-elders. 7. The conservative of magical Power.

-vii-

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On Power, Its Nature and the History of Its Growth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Translator's Note xiii
  • Preface xv
  • The Minotaur Presented 1
  • Book I - Metaphysics of Power 15
  • I. of Civil Obedience 17
  • Book II - Origins of Power 61
  • Iv. the Magical Origins of Power 63
  • Book III - Of the Nature of Power 93
  • Vi. the Dialectic of Command 95
  • VII- the Expansionist Character Of Power 119
  • Book IV - The State as Permanent Revolution 155
  • IX- Power, Assailant of The Social Order 157
  • Xi. Power and Beliefs 194
  • Book V - The Face of Power Changes, But Not Its Nature 213
  • Xii. of Revolutions 215
  • Xiii. Imperium and Democracy 236
  • Book VI - Limited Power or Unlimited Power? 281
  • Xv. Limited Power 283
  • Xvii. Liberty's Aristocratic Roots 317
  • Xix. Order or Social Protectorate 336
  • Epilogue - Written by the Translator 379
  • Notes 383
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