Western Lands and the American Revolution

By Thomas Perkins Abernethy | Go to book overview

PREFACE

IN his work, The Mississippi Valley in British Politics, Professor Clarence W. Alvord dealt with the problem of the American West during the colonial period, treating it from the point of view of the imperial administration. Various studies dealing with the American side of the question have been made, all of which deal with special areas or phases of the subject. The object of this volume is to bring together in a single narrative an account of the American West from the time when its exploitation was begun by English colonists to the end of the Confederation period. The term "West" as used herein includes the country lying between the Appalachian divide and the Mississippi River. The area situated north of the Ohio is not discussed beyond the time when it passed under the control of Congress in 1784. To trace the development of the legislation and the land companies which shaped its destinies would be to retell a story that has often been told, and one which should be carried beyond the limits of the Confederation period if its significance is to be made clear.

With the exception of Professor Alvord's treatment of the British phase of the subject, most of the writings on the West have dealt primarily with the problem of frontier development rather than with the political aspects of the matter. Since the main object of this study is to treat of the political problem no attempt has been made to deal with all phases of the question of Western lands, but only those which had some demonstrable political effect. To this end it has been necessary to pay some attention to the policy of the Continental Congress and to that of several of the colonies and States in dealing with the West. Since Virginia lay claim to so much of the country involved her activities are of paramount interest, and this side of the problem has, in the past, been peculiarly neglected. Historians have commonly manifested a leaning toward the side of her opponents, taking the attitude that because her claims were large, they were consequently unjust. In doing this, they have often neglected the legal phases of the question. The author hopes that he has succeeded in adhering strictly to the legal and political points involved, but the matter is so complicated and controversial that he cannot hope to have escaped all error.

Men generally appear at their worst when in pursuit of material gain.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Western Lands and the American Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.