Western Lands and the American Revolution

By Thomas Perkins Abernethy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXII
THE MOVEMENT FOR NEW WESTERN STATES, 1784-1785

DURING 1783 William Blount and his North Carolina company had obtained the consent of the Cherokee Indians to settle the Muscle Shoals country, but the transaction was not to be complete until the stipulated quantity of goods should be delivered to the natives. The fact that the Spanish were planning a settlement at the Shoals had a bearing upon the question. Blount now appealed to the Georgia assembly for a grant; on February 20, 1784, this object was accomplished to his satisfaction although an outright grant was not made. By a resolution of this date, a board of seven men was created to inspect and report on the Muscle Shoals lands. These seven were furthermore given the status of justices of the peace for the "District and County of Tennessee." They were authorized to appoint military officers and to grant lands at the rate of an eighth of a dollar per acre, but no person was to have more than a thousand acres. The next day Lachlan McIntosh, Junior, William Downes, Stephen Heard, John Morell, John Donelson, Joseph Martin, and John Sevier were named to constitute the commission. The four Georgians were members of the assembly; the three Carolina members were Blount's appointees. Patrick Henry was not apparently a member of Blount's company, but he took a lively interest in it.1

On May 31 Blount wrote to the Georgia commissioners saying that he supposed their object in going into the enterprise was the same as his own, namely, private emolument. He offered to make to each of them a donation of an equal share in the stock of the company. The resolution creating the commission had apparently provided that its members should be compensated for their services, but Blount interpreted the ambiguous wording to mean that they had a right to make a compensation to the company in the form of a land grant, and he urged that this should be as large as possible. He thought, in fact, that

____________________
1
Allen D. Chester ed., The Revolutionary Records of the State of Georgia ( Atlanta, 1908) II, 738-739, III, 492, 525-526; Henry to Joseph Martin, Feb. 4, 1785, Draper MSS., 15ZZ25-28; Alexander Martin to Joseph Martin, Feb. 11, 1784, ibid., 1XX69; copy of Blount's petition, Feb. 28, 1784, J. G. Blount MSS., N.C.H.C.

-288-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Western Lands and the American Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.