20
Base Metals

The base metals fall into three categories - (a) those essential to the production of iron and steel and including iron (see ch. 25) and manganese, (b) those used for alloying with pig iron in the manufacture of special steels - manganese, chromium, nickel, tungsten, vanadium, cobalt, and molybdenum, and (c) those used for special purposes outside the iron and steel industry - copper, tin, lead, antimony, etc. South Africa mines most of these metals for export, consequently their production has been greatly influenced by world market conditions. In the case of some of them the U.S.S.R. is an important producer. The South African production of most base metals fell during the depression of the early 1930's and that of manganese and chrome, especially after the U.S.S R. dumped large quantities at low prices on world markets. The production of some rose sharply during the second world war and during the subsequent period of stockpiling. Today world politics greatly influence the production of strategic minerals. The U.S.S.R. no longer supplies the Western World but the lessening of international tension and a resumption of free trade between East and West would alter the position. South Africa might then have difficulty in competing with Soviet Russia in the production of some of the minerals with which she is well endowed.


Manganese

After iron ore, coke and limestone, manganese is the most important raw material of the modern iron and steel industry, in which it plays a triple role. The ore is used in the blast furnaces producing pig iron for basic steel manufacture, 1 cwt. per ton of pig iron being added mainly to neutralize the harmful effect of sulphur. Ferro-manganese is employed as a deoxidizer in steel melting while small quantities of the metal are used in the production of high manganese steel which is exceptionally tough and resistant to wear. The demand for manganese is closely related to activity in the world's heavy industries and since 1939 has been conditioned by strategic considerations.

South Africa possesses large reserves of manganese ore closely associated with iron ore in Griqualand West.1 The deposits were first discovered near

-320-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
South Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 698

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.