Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2

By Moncure Daniel Conway | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIII.

Residence in Concord--Hon. Martin F. Conway-- Garrison and Phillips --Editing the Commonwealth--Hymn for a New Advent--Watch Night in the African Church--Lecture Tour in New York--The President's Proclamation--Deputation to the President--My Sermon before the Senate--Interview with Lincoln--Disheartened Leaders--OliverWendell Holmes--Nathaniel Hawthorne in Concord, 1862-63.

WE went at once to reside at Concord, in a house just vacated by Rev. Mr. Frost. This house, the first we ever owned, was pretty; it stood in a large garden, well stocked with fruit and flowers, at its centre a bower of evergreen. As we were moving in, Robert Collyer came to pass a day or two with us. We had a cook, but told him that "though we could gladly eat him, we couldn't sleep him," unless he was content with a pallet. To this he did not object, and was soon helping to gather in the apples and wheeling our little Emerson on the top of them, helping in every way and turning work into merriment. But after his one night on the floor, my wife remarked a smile of satisfaction on Collyer's face when another bedstead arrived.

We were happy in Concord. I had made the acquaintance of most people in it during my college days, and my wife was received cordially. Some of them she already knew; Mrs. Horace Mann she had known at Yellow Springs during her husband's presidency at Antioch College. Emerson had been with us several times in Cincinnati, and we had entertained there Bronson Alcott. Mrs. Mann, who had long had warm friendship for my wife, was living in Concord with her sister, Elizabeth Peabody, the other sister being Mrs. Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Another literary resident was William Ellery Channing, nephew of the famous preacher whose name he bore. There was something forbidding about the man--at any rate when we met--so our acquaintance was slight. I would have been glad

-324-

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Autobiography: Memories and Experiences of Moncure Daniel Conway - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Dedication and Preface. vii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 19
  • Chapter IV 32
  • Chapter V 43
  • Chapter VI 52
  • Chapter VII 58
  • Chapter IX 86
  • Chapter X 101
  • Chapter XI 112
  • Chapter XII 126
  • Chapter XIII 139
  • Chapter XIV 156
  • Chapter XV 165
  • Chapter XVI 179
  • Chapter XVII 196
  • Chapter XVIII 222
  • Chapter XIX 243
  • Chapter XX 259
  • Chapter XXI 281
  • Chapter XXII 302
  • Chapter XXIII 324
  • Chapter XXIV 345
  • Chapter XXV 351
  • Chapter XVII 362
  • Chapter XXVII 387
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