The Spyglass, Views and Reviews, 1924-1930: Selected and Edited by John Tyree Fain

By Donald Davidson | Go to book overview

Vaguely but boldly, an editorial proclamation sets forth the magazine as the organ of certain persons "disgusted with literature as it is at present perpetrated in the United States." The plan of the editors is to "revitalize and introduce new rhythms in creative writing." They announce themselves as opposed with equal determination to the "sentimental" and the "forced, the far-fetched."

Being without information other than the magazine contains, I hesitate to offer an opinion as to whether Blues is a student prank; or the project of some exile from Greenwich Village, come down to winter in the South and to subject the Mississippians to his civilizing influence; or the effort of some native brother who has returned from a season among the enlightened spirits of the North and is now consenting to act as a sort of local Messiah of literature. It is too bad that the magazine itself betrays no evidence that anything very original is on foot. I have an unhappy feeling that neither Mississippi nor American literatare can be saved from disaster by the publication of Blues. A quick and easy passing, with the least possible pain and inconvenience to the editors, is the best I could wish for the magazine.


Book-of-the-Month Club Critic's Almanac April 28, 1929

The Book-of-the-Month Club is being assaulted from various quarters. Mr. John Macrae, president of E. P. Dutton Company, quarreled vehemently with the club, the immediate occasion being the selection of The Cradle ofthe Deep

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