The Spyglass, Views and Reviews, 1924-1930: Selected and Edited by John Tyree Fain

By Donald Davidson | Go to book overview

these same great magazines, which, correctly judging the national pulse to be throbbing at least momentarily with interest in things Southern, gave these two authors space, will on some tomorrow present, with admirable catholicity, the direct opposite of all that our two authors stand for. And the hundreds of thousands of readers, racing nervously from contemporary problem to contemporary problem-- learning the mystery of glands, exploring the intricacies of Einstein, getting acquainted with Mussolini, delving into the sociology of crime, and occasionally slicing into a story by Hemingway or Callaghan as one tastes a pickle for its sour contrast--will simply continue to do that and nothing more. We thank our stars, of course, that the awe-inspiring monthlies are "public-minded," but we are scared to death of their terrific program of ideas, all the same. I wish profoundly (like a foolish sectional Southerner, devoted to the old home place) that there were something nearer home, if less efficient and famous--a general periodical with a definite policy, to give us some feeling of consistency and safety.*


Phillips's Life and Labor in the Old South Critic's Almanac June 9, 1929

In the years from Appomattox to Al Smith the South has been visited with misfortunes that need no retelling here; and not the least of these, as John Crowe Ransom firmly points out in the current Harper's, has been the "toxic

____________________
*
The Southern Review, edited by Charles W. Pipkin, Cleanth Brooks, and Robert Penn Warren, began publication in Baton Rouge in July 1935.

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