The Spyglass, Views and Reviews, 1924-1930: Selected and Edited by John Tyree Fain

By Donald Davidson | Go to book overview

"service," "prosperity," and "progress," often hides a low purpose and a selfish creed?

The South, at least, in the day when history is doing belated justice, might well revive, especially in its younger generation, the historical consciousness that has always been part of its peculiar genius. Thinking on irs past, always inevitably involved with its present, is the South not likely to find, while it views its old foe of the North with friendship and generosity, the Southern shade of Jefferson a more comforting one for the future than the other shade which with all its material grandeur is, as of yore, a little too much kin to the powers of darkness?


What Does History Mean? Critic's Almanac October 20, 1929

Much has been said on this page recently about Southern authors and Southern books. To impatient readers who may want a discussion of such contemporary writers as Ernest Hemingway and Al Smith, I can only say that the end is not yet. Their time will come, but for the moment Southern issues are red hot. Hard blows are being struck, and it is no time for folding of the hands in pure aesthetic contemplation. Passing over the obvious dominance of the South in the field of the novel (see Stark Young, Ellen Glasgow, and others), I call attention to the no less remarkable swing to the field of Southern history and social problems.

Powerful books have tumbled upon us in rapid succession, from the hands of Winston, Stryker, Bowers and

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