A Short History of Italian Painting

By Alice Van Vechten Brown; William Rankin | Go to book overview

EARLY NORTH ITALY1

COMPLETE independence was impossible for North Italian schools, set as they were on the high-road between Northern Europe and Central Italy and with Venice stretching into them on the east. Both ideas and forms were introduced from the Levant, from Northern Europe,2 from Florence, Siena, and the Marches, and in the Renaissance from Venice. Northern Italy is divided into certain more or less distinct regions.

The Veneto is the low alluvial region in the north-east between the lagoons of Venice and the foot-hills of the Alps; it is connected geographically and sometimes was politically with Venice. Its eastern portion is called Friuli.3 Its western portion includes the territories of Verona and Padua, at first independent, finally absorbed by Venice.

The great central plain of North Italy was divided between Milan and its dependencies on the north-west, and the fertile region adjoining the Veneto between the Po and the Apennines, called the Emilia,4 which included among others the great cities of Bologna and Ferrara.

Finally, there were Piedmont and Genoa on the west, affiliated with each other rather than with Milan, and connected with Northern Europe by both political and commercial relationships.

The conditions of North Italian art are more complex than in Central Italy. It is less centralised at a few points and less controlled by a dominant tradition. There is more exchange of

____________________
1
General guides are Ricci, N. Italy; B. B., N. Ital. Painters, whose authority we closely follow for the relations of the minor N. Ital. Renaiss. schools. Vent., VII, for early masters; Frizzoni, including numerous articles in periodicals, and the catalogues of the galleries of Milan and Turin. For special studies see books and articles by F. Malaguzzi-Valeri.
2
For relation of French Primatives to 14th c. Italians, see Fry's arts., Burl. Mag., June, July, 1904, and Buchot, L'.Arte, VII, 223-40. C. & C., N. Italy, and Morelli are now out of date.
3
Named from Forum Julii. Important for extant monuments of the 7th and 8th c. Borderland of NE. Italy. Lies between the river Piave and the present Austrian frontier = half mountain and half valley, lovely landscape and poor soil. Western Veneto lies between rivers Piave (E.), Mincio (W.), Po (S.).
4
From the ancient Via Æmilia, stretching from Rimini to Piacenza. Named from its builder, M. Æmilius Lepidus, consul 187 B.C.

-71-

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A Short History of Italian Painting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations xiii
  • Note on Technical Terms xvii
  • List of Abbreviations xix
  • Part I - The Mediæval Period and Proto-Renaissance 1
  • Mediæval 3
  • Proto-Renaissance 9
  • Siena to 1400 18
  • The School of Simone Martini 26
  • Forence to 1400 40
  • Early North Italy 71
  • Early Umbria 83
  • Giovanni and Antonio of Murano 97
  • Part II - The Early Renaissance in Florence and Central Italy 99
  • Masolino and Masaccio 101
  • Fra Angelico 110
  • Other Fifteenth-Century Florentines 116
  • The Umbro-Florentines 139
  • Siena from About 1400 to 1500 148
  • Renaissance Umbria 153
  • Part III - The Early Renaissance in Padua and Venice and Renaissance North Italy 165
  • Squarcione 1394-1474 167
  • Antonello Da Messina C. 1430-1479 168
  • Carlo Crivelli - 1440?-After 1493 169
  • Renaissance North Italy 198
  • Part IV - The Florentine High Renaissance and Raphael 209
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - 1452-1519 211
  • Lesser High Renaissance Painters 225
  • Michelangelo - 1475-1564 234
  • Raphael Sanzio - 1483-1520 and Followers 246
  • Part V - High Renaissance Venice 261
  • Jacopo Palma Vecchio - 1480 263
  • Giorgione 264
  • Sebastiano Del Piombo - C. 1485-1547 269
  • Tintoretto and Veronese 278
  • I Tintoretto - 1518-1592 279
  • Paolo Veronese - 1528-1588 286
  • Minor Followers of Giorgione and Titian 289
  • Part VI - North Italy in the High Renaissance 297
  • High Renaissance North Italy 299
  • Minor High Renaissance Painters of North Italy 305
  • Rome, Naples, Sicily 311
  • The Late Renaissance and Baroque 313
  • Index to Artists and Paintings Mentioned 337
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