A Short History of Italian Painting

By Alice Van Vechten Brown; William Rankin | Go to book overview

in magnificent colour. To follow them further leads into the Late Renaissance and Baroque.1


PAOLO VERONESE2
1528-1588

In Paolo Cagliari of Verona the style of art represented by Bonifazio continues in a more monumental style. Ceremonial and festivity mark the new Venetian taste, earlier seen in Gentile Bellini, Carpaccio, and Bonifazio, and carried on in Badile and Brusasorci of Verona, who marked the beginning of a decadent and baroque taste in Venice.3 Yet Veronese himself is unspoiled and entirely wholesome. His reputed master, Antonio Badile, helps little to explain him. Richter4 and Berenson emphasize the influence of Brusasorci upon the young painter, but his work is Venetian in spirit rather than provincial, although in some early pictures, which are looser in form and pattern than later work, as the Deposition, London, a light colour scheme and less forceful execution betrays the influence of the Veronese masters, particularly Brusasorci. Yet in other early pictures,5 as the Martyrdom of S. Giustina (Uffizi), Titian's forming influence is evident.

Veronese's life seems to have been uneventful, except that he was evidently at home in the magnificent events which seem to have made Venetian life a continual pageant. From his art he appears as a man of the world, gracious and tolerant, at once a participator and an onlooker, the friend and painter of the characters he so courteously portrays. He so sympathises with the life about him that he tends to secularise religious themes, and in the religious reaction of the time he was called before the Inquisition and rebuked for the humorous motives--monkeys, etc.--introduced into a religious scene. He was courted and beset with orders. Some of the most magnificent commissions of the Ducal Palace are his, and his paintings abound in Venice and

____________________
1
The famous El Greco of the Spanish school was a pupil of Tintoretto.
2
Von Hadeln essay, Th.-B. Lex., most authoritative publication on Veronese.
3
See Badile Presentation, Turin, and Brusasorci Historical Scenes, Pal. Ridolfi, Verona.
4
Lectures on the National Gallery.
5
Early according to B. B.

-286-

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A Short History of Italian Painting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations xiii
  • Note on Technical Terms xvii
  • List of Abbreviations xix
  • Part I - The Mediæval Period and Proto-Renaissance 1
  • Mediæval 3
  • Proto-Renaissance 9
  • Siena to 1400 18
  • The School of Simone Martini 26
  • Forence to 1400 40
  • Early North Italy 71
  • Early Umbria 83
  • Giovanni and Antonio of Murano 97
  • Part II - The Early Renaissance in Florence and Central Italy 99
  • Masolino and Masaccio 101
  • Fra Angelico 110
  • Other Fifteenth-Century Florentines 116
  • The Umbro-Florentines 139
  • Siena from About 1400 to 1500 148
  • Renaissance Umbria 153
  • Part III - The Early Renaissance in Padua and Venice and Renaissance North Italy 165
  • Squarcione 1394-1474 167
  • Antonello Da Messina C. 1430-1479 168
  • Carlo Crivelli - 1440?-After 1493 169
  • Renaissance North Italy 198
  • Part IV - The Florentine High Renaissance and Raphael 209
  • Leonardo Da Vinci - 1452-1519 211
  • Lesser High Renaissance Painters 225
  • Michelangelo - 1475-1564 234
  • Raphael Sanzio - 1483-1520 and Followers 246
  • Part V - High Renaissance Venice 261
  • Jacopo Palma Vecchio - 1480 263
  • Giorgione 264
  • Sebastiano Del Piombo - C. 1485-1547 269
  • Tintoretto and Veronese 278
  • I Tintoretto - 1518-1592 279
  • Paolo Veronese - 1528-1588 286
  • Minor Followers of Giorgione and Titian 289
  • Part VI - North Italy in the High Renaissance 297
  • High Renaissance North Italy 299
  • Minor High Renaissance Painters of North Italy 305
  • Rome, Naples, Sicily 311
  • The Late Renaissance and Baroque 313
  • Index to Artists and Paintings Mentioned 337
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