H. M. Hyndman and British Socialism

By Chushichi Tsuzuki; Henry Pelling | Go to book overview

XII LAST YEARS

I

IN 1917 Hyndman attained the age of seventy-five. The war was at too serious a stage for him to spend much time in celebration; he still remained astonishingly vigorous, and he devoted a high proportion of his energy to politics, as he had done with hardly a break for thirty-seven years. In 1917 he and his wife moved to 13 Well Walk, Hampstead, where the air was better and where he could do a little gardening as a recreation. The N.S.P. executive could not conveniently meet there, as it had met at Queen Anne's Gate; but that was the only important change of routine that was involved. Somewhat straitened circumstances, however, necessitated the letting of some of the rooms of the new house to congenial lodgers.1

Some of Hyndman's political activities at this time bordered on the hysterical, although these years of bitter warfare and the harsh censorship of news gave rise to all sorts of absurdities. He joined in the Morning Post's campaign to root out enemy spies on the British home front, and himself volunteered to investigate the activities of 'German spy waiters' in London. Fortunately for his reputation, the police declined his co-operation in its security work.2 He bitterly denounced the 'treachery' of government officials and demanded a thorough overhaul of the Foreign Office. He got hold of a list of Foreign Office employees: 'What was my

____________________
1
R. T. Hyndman, Last Years, pp. 146, 278.
2
Hyndman to Simons, 12 Aug. 1917, Simons Papers.

-243-

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H. M. Hyndman and British Socialism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Editor''s Note vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Plates x
  • I- Scion of Empire 1
  • II- Tory Radical 13
  • III- Founding the Democratic Federation 1880-1884 31
  • IV- Riots and Ructions 57
  • V- New Unions and ''Independent Labour'' 87
  • VI- Imperialism and the Second International 112
  • VII- Low Spirits, High Finance 132
  • VIII- Labour Alliance or Socialist Unity? 152
  • IX- Syndicalists and Suffragettes 179
  • X- The German Menace 194
  • XI- World War and Revolution 218
  • XII- Last Years 243
  • XIII- Epilogue 268
  • Appendix A - S.D.F. Finances 277
  • Appendix B - S.D.F. Membership 281
  • Appendix C - Bibliography of Works by H. M. Hyndman 286
  • Appendix D - List of Unpublished Sources Consulted 291
  • Index 293
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