Novels of the Eighteen-Forties

By Kathleen Tillotson | Go to book overview

APPENDIX I

From "Master Humphrey's Clock", No. LXXIX, October 1841 ( Barnaby Rudge, ch. LXV).


TO THE READERS OF 'MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK'

DEAR FRIENDS,

NEXT November, we shall have finished the Tale, on which we are at present engaged; and shall have travelled together through Twenty Monthly Parts, and Eighty-seven Weekly Numbers. It is my design, when we have gone so far, to close this work. Let me tell you why.

I should not regard the anxiety, the close confinement, or the constant attention, inseparable from the weekly form of publication (for to commune with you, in any form, is to me a labour of love), if I had found it advantageous to the conduct of my stories, the elucidation of my meaning, or the gradual development of my characters. But I have not done so. I have often felt cramped and confined in a very irksome and harassing degree, by the space in which I have been constrained to move. I have wanted you to know more at once than I could tell you; and it has frequently been of the greatest importance to my cherished intention, that you should do so. I have been sometimes strongly tempted (and have been at some pains to resist the temptation) to hurry incidents on, lest they should appear to you who waited from week to week, and had not, like me, the result and purpose in your minds, too long delayed. In a word, I have found this form of publication most anxious, perplexing, and difficult. I cannot bear these jerking confidences which are no sooner begun than ended, and no sooner ended than begun again.

-314-

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Novels of the Eighteen-Forties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • Note on Editions and References xii
  • Abbreviated Titles - Of Works Frequently Referred To xiii
  • Part I Introductory 1
  • Part II Four Novels 157
  • Mary Barton 202
  • Vanity Fair 224
  • Jane Eyre 257
  • Appendix I 314
  • Appendix II 316
  • Appendix III 318
  • Index 319
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