The Economic Impact on Under-Developed Societies: Essays on International Investment and Social Change

By S. Herbert Frankel | Go to book overview

ESSAY VII
INVESTMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTINENT OF AFRICA

I. INTRODUCTION

To endeavour to epitomize the problems of capital investment in a continent in a few pages must in itself be regarded as presumptuous; to make the attempt when that continent is Africa, with its immense regional, political, and racial diversities, may well be foolhardy. In this essay I endeavour to focus attention on certain fundamental issues which are in some degree common to Africa south of the Sahara.

This approach has obvious limitations. It precludes the detailed examination of trade, balance of payments, 'National Income', and similar economic indices for the separate territories; of the differences in the rate of economic change in them; of the great variations in population density in different areas; and of the effects of population growth on the economic utilization of resources or on the break-down of particular systems of production.

I hope, however, in this way to contrast the basic nature or the investment problems with which the modern world is faced in Africa with those which now predominantly engage the attention of economists in the highly industrialized economies of Europe and America. In these latter attention has, in our generation, been increasingly concentrated on problems of investment in relation to anti-cyclical policy. In a continent, however, most of whose indigenous peoples had, for better or for worse, little more than a generation ago never experienced any of the so-called blessings of modern economic organization, not to speak of the social heritage-- technological, scientific, or cultural--of the West, and whose views, if any, on 'social security' were necessarily concerned rather with avoiding enslavement and the ravages of inter- tribal warfare, famine, or disease, than with the problems of the 'Welfare State', it is not perhaps surprising that disputation about saving, income, and employment, and their

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Economic Impact on Under-Developed Societies: Essays on International Investment and Social Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.