The Life and Death of Louis XVI

By Saul K. Padover | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
"My daughter will love you"

THE ORPHANED DAUPHIN was left alone. He had no friends, and his relatives were interested in other things than a dull boy; this was particularly true of Louis XV, who was too absorbed in his new mistress Du Barry to have any time for a grandson. With no one to guide him, the boy sank into a sort of barbarism, avoiding the society of his equals and spending his time in the forest and the forge.

His appearance and behavior shocked the perfumed courtiers and filled the ladies with consternation. There he was, the future ruler of France, a barrel-chested led with untidy blond hair, grinning at courtiers like a country bumpkin and bursting into loud, offensive laughter at pranks played by his low-born companions. His manners, like his language, were those of a stable-boy. "The fat, ill-bred boy," the usually good-natured Madame Du Barry called him. Others were no less harsh. "He seems to have been born and raised in the forest," said the Neapolitan ambassador. And the Duke de Choiseul told Louis XV that unless the dauphin changed his conduct he would become the "horror of the nation."

But Louis XV was too indifferent to waste time on his successor. Possibly he feared that the boy, reputed to be as pious as his mother and as prudish as his father, would disapprove of his way of life. At his age His Majesty was not going to reform for the benefit of a youngster! He thought it

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life and Death of Louis XVI
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 375

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.