Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1858 - Vol. 1

By Albert J. Beveridge | Go to book overview

ABRAHAM LINCOLN
CHAPTER I
KENTUCKY: BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD

Biographies, as generally written, are not only misleading, but false. The author makes a wonderful hero of his subject. He magnifies his perfections, if he has any, and suppresses his imperfections. History is not history unless it is the truth. LINCOLN.

IN America, democracy was in control of Congress; and the popular idol, Thomas Jefferson, was enthroned in the Presidency. His choice of a successor had been ratified by the people, and James Madison was about to be inaugurated. The great radical and politician was soon to retire from office with such public acclaim as no President ever received.

In spite of grave mistakes, Jefferson had achieved this phenomenal favor with the masses chiefly by his sincere and expressed faith in the people, a faith they instinctively felt; also by his theoretical championship of States' rights and opposition to strong national government -- an attitude then considered by the majority as best assuring individual liberty and preventing spoliation of the poor and the weak.

The Federalist party, first and most constructive of American political organizations, was fast dissolving. For five years, Hamilton, preëminent supporter of national power and the almost undisputed Federalist chieftain, had been in his grave. Notwithstanding the soundness of many Federalist policies, that party was disintegrating, principally because of its sharp and outspoken distrust of the people, but also by reason of its British partisanship, and its resistance to the westward advance of the Republic.

brks="brks"> France and England were at war and, as the result of Jefferson's policy of prohibiting imports and abolishing foreign commerce, American trade on the sea had all but ceased and the American flag had well-nigh disappeared from the oceans. All

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1858 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 607

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.