2
AGE-OLD MARKETS AND MODERN SCHOOLS

WHEN I REVIVE ALL MY MEMORIES OF THOSE FIRST MONTHS IN Mexico, the effect upon my consciousness is that of a shifting photo-montage, blurred and kaleidoscopic. It may well be, however, that these first impressions were more valid than later ones, for they were completely spontaneous, unlike those of today which I have tried to temper with serenity, even to the point of often losing sight of the original issue. The dividing line between intelligent comprehension and a too-willing forgiveness is often a fragile one and easily trespassed.

There was a dreamlike substance to these early days, and I remember them as fevered, with one picture crowding and jostling the other until all continuity is destroyed; the effect is strangely akin to that produced upon me by the music of Silvestre Revueltas, for in the compositions of that massive, rumpled-haired, calm-eyed yet inwardly tortured man, Mexico fairly assaults the consciousness, as fireworks rend the darkness and set it aglow; one not only hears the thin piping of native instruments and the dizzy throb of a ridiculous little

-28-

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Mexico Reborn
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Passage to Mexico 1
  • 2 - Age-Old Markets And Modern Schools 28
  • 3 - Cardenas Campaigns For President 58
  • 4 - Labor's Challenge 80
  • 5 - Portrait of Santa Maria Tepeji 109
  • 6 - A Laguna: an Experiment In Collective Farming 125
  • 7 - Freedom for Mexican Women 148
  • 8 - Anarchy in Art 170
  • 9 - Oil -- Mexico's Magnet 198
  • 10 - 'Marxists' Versus Fascists 226
  • II - Presidential Parade: 1940 Version 256
  • 12 - Six Years in Mexico: A Summary 279
  • Index 307
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